hemogram

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hemogram

 [he´mo-gram]
a graphic representation of a detailed blood assessment such as the complete blood count or the differential leukocyte count.

he·mo·gram

(hē'mō-gram),
A complete detailed record of the findings in a thorough examination of the blood, especially with reference to the numbers, proportions, and morphologic features of the formed elements.
[hemo- + G. gramma, a drawing]

hemogram

[hē′məgram]
Etymology: Gk, haima + gramma, record
a written or graphic record of a differential blood count that emphasizes the size, shape, special characteristics, and numbers of the solid components of the blood. See also complete blood count.

he·mo·gram

(hē'mō-gram)
A complete detailed record of the findings in a thorough examination of the blood, especially with reference to the numbers, proportions, and morphologic features of the formed elements.
Synonym(s): haemogram.
[hemo- + G. gramma, a drawing]

hemogram

a graphic or tabular representation of the differential blood count.
References in periodicals archive ?
After seven days, the haemogram showed improvement of the anaemia, with haemoglobin levels at 6.
It is difficult to overemphasise the importance of supplementing instrumentgenerated figures in the haemogram by careful scrutiny of a well-prepared blood film or smear.
Complete haemogram, liver and renal function tests were done every month for the first 6 months and whenever indicated.
The haemogram was conspicuous for the lack of leucocytosis with a low normal total leucocyte count (TLC) of 4200 cells/[mm.
16 In practical application, clinicians use inflammatory tests such as C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate and haemogram as activation markers, although they are nonspecific tests in BD.
Rectal temperature was 103[degrees]F and haemogram was characterized by neutrophilia and low haemoglobin concentration.
Complete Haemogram revealed a normal blood picture except for increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (40 mm).
For other haemogram parameters, blood samples were processed through automated haemotology analyzer Celltac a Mek 6420K (Nihon Kohden Japan) according to manufacturer's instructions.
Laeukemia cases were diagnosed on the basis of conventional methods which included detailed clinical examination, haemogram and bone marrow biopsy in accordance with French-American-British co-operative group (17) while lymphoma cases were diagnosed as per the criteria of Rappaport et al (18).
His investigations (complete haemogram, blood sugar, liver and renal function tests) were all within normal limits.
Other tests, including haemogram, blood chemistry, coagulation parameters, stool microscopy, barium-meal follow through (if indicated), and x-ray wrist, were done.
Response to therapy was monitored using complete haemogram, red cell indices, reticulocyte count, peripheral smear and serum iron at the end of every month in the followup visits for next three months.