heme

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Related to Haeme: Heme iron

heme

 [hēm]
the nonprotein, insoluble, iron protoporphyrin constituent of hemoglobin, of various other respiratory pigments, and of many cells, both animal and vegetable. It is an iron compound and constitutes the pigment portion or protein-free part of the hemoglobin molecule, and is responsible for its oxygen-carrying properties.

heme

(hēm),
1. The porphyrin chelate of iron in which the iron is Fe(II) (or Fe2+); the oxygen-carrying, color-furnishing, prosthetic group of hemoglobin.
2. Iron complexed with nonporphyrins but related tetrapyrrole structures (for example, biliverdin heme).
3. Iron chelated with any porphyrin, irrespective of the valence state of the iron atom.
[G. haima, blood]

heme

(hēm)
n.
A deep red, iron-containing compound, C34H32FeN4O4, that constitutes the nonprotein component of hemoglobin and certain other proteins.

heme

 An iron-containing red pigment which, with a protein, globin, forms hemoglobin

heme

(hēm)
1. The porphyrin chelate of iron in which the iron is Fe(II) (Fe2+); the oxygen-carrying, color-furnishing, prosthetic group of hemoglobin.
2. Iron complexed with nonporphyrins but related tetrapyrrole structures (e.g., biliverdin heme).
Synonym(s): reduced hematin, haem.
[G. haima, blood]

heme

see HAEM.

Heme

The iron-containing molecule in hemoglobin that serves as the site for oxygen binding.

heme

(hēm)
1. The oxygen-carrying, color-furnishing, prosthetic group of hemoglobin.
2. Iron complexed with nonporphyrins but related tetrapyrrole structures.
Synonym(s): reduced hematin, haem.
[G. haima, blood]
References in periodicals archive ?
Decrease in Hb concentration could be due to decrease in RBC (or) impaired biosynthesis of haeme in bone marrow.
Each step in the metabolism of haeme to conjugated bilirubin involves enzymes.
Studies with the haeme oxygenase inhibitor Sn-protoporphyrin in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis and idiopathic haemochromatosis.
Luo, "Ischaemic post-conditioning protects lung from ischaemia-reperfusion injury by up-regulation of haeme oxygenase-1," Injury, vol.
[53] suggested that a higher intake of haeme iron might be harmful, whereas a higher intake of zinc might be beneficial in relation to CVD mortality in the presence of a trigger that can disturb iron homeostasis, such as alcohol consumption.
Studies in mice have shown that recombinant Hb retains physiologically relevant oxygen and haeme affinity, stability toward denaturation and oxidation, and effective oxygen delivery as indicated by reduced cerebral ischemic damage.