haemarthrosis


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

he·mar·thro·sis

(hēm'ahr-thrō'sis)
Blood in a joint.
Synonym(s): haemarthrosis.
[G. haima, blood, + arthron, joint]

haemarthrosis

Blood within a joint space. This can occur from injury or disease such as SCURVY or HAEMOPHILIA. There is pain, heat, swelling and muscle spasm. Such blood soon absorbs but repeated episodes cause damage and crippling deformity.

he·mar·thro·sis

(hēm'ahr-thrō'sis)
Blood in a joint.
Synonym(s): haemarthrosis.
[G. haima, blood, + arthron, joint]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Associated MCL injuries (41%) were more common compared to LCL injuries (3%), and 32% of ACL injuries had a haemarthrosis for this mechanism.
As factor VIII is usually only mildly reduced or normal in vWD, the manifestations in patients with haemophilia, a severe coagulation factor deficiency disorder, such as haemarthrosis and deep muscle haematomas, are rare, except in type 3 disease.
Ultrasonography in the monitoring of management of haemarthrosis. Haemophilia.
[8] observed in a canine model that weight-bearing joints, as opposed to non-weight-bearing joints with haemarthrosis, suffered progressive and degenerative damage after a bleeding episode.
Ultrasound showed a large periarticular haemarthrosis and an associated tear in the rotator cuff.
In 9 patients (3 women, 6 men) knee extension contracture developed after various surgical interventions and prolonged immobilization on the injured knee (meniscus tears, ligament and haemarthrosis).
Arthroscopy revealed a tense haemarthrosis and no evidence of infection; this was confirmed on microbiological cultures.
(2,3,6-9,17-21) The occurrence of subsequent swelling secondary to haemarthrosis is approximately twenty percent in a peripheral (vascular) meniscus tear.
(15) Most hemophilia A and B patients presented with bleeding after circumcision or with haemarthrosis.
Acute traumatic haemarthrosis of the knee: expectant treatment or arthroscopy?
Also ankle inversion injuries are often accompanied by a variety of physiological responses including bruising, oedema, haemarthrosis (Safran et al 1999), muscle inhibition and capsular distension (Wilkerson and Nitz 1994), and hence information gained by isolating and studying the causes of recurrent ankle sprains in simulation models that do not replicate injurious events or their associated discomfort levels adequately (e.g., Sheth et al 1997) may be of little value, especially if it is not possible to predict a priori which receptors might be implicated or redundant in any injurious sequence of events.
Experimental haemarthrosis produces mild inflammation associated with intracellular Maltese crosses.