habituation


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habituation

 [hah-bich″u-a´shun]
1. the gradual adaptation to a stimulus or to the environment.
2. the extinction of a conditioned reflex by repetition of the conditioned stimulus.
3. older term denoting sometimes tolerance and other times a psychological dependence resulting from the repeated consumption of a drug, with a desire to continue its use, but with little or no tendency to increase the dose.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ha·bit·u·a·tion

(ha-bit'chū-ā'shŭn),
1. The process of forming a habit, referring generally to psychological dependence on the continued use of a drug to maintain a sense of well-being, which can result in drug addiction.
2. The method by which the nervous system reduces or inhibits responsiveness during repeated stimulation.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

habituation

(hə-bĭch′o͞o-ā′shən)
n.
1. The process of habituating or the state of being habituated.
2. Physiological tolerance to a drug resulting from repeated use.
3. Psychology The decline in responsiveness to a stimulus due to repeated exposure.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

habituation

Psychology An adaptive response characterized by a ↓ reactivity to a repeated stimulus–eg, a substance of abuse or repeated electrical stimulation of a nerve
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ha·bit·u·a·tion

(hă-bich'ū-ā'shŭn)
1. The process of forming a habit, referring generally to psychological dependence on the continued use of a drug to maintain a sense of well-being, which can result in drug addiction.
2. The method by which the nervous system reduces or inhibits responsiveness during repeated stimulation.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

habituation

The development of a tolerance or dependence by repetition or prolonged exposure. From the Latin habituare , to bring into a condition.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

habituation

the progressive loss of a behavioural response as a result of continued stimulation.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

ha·bit·u·a·tion

(hă-bich'ū-ā'shŭn)
1. Process of forming a habit, referring generally to psychological dependence on continued use of a drug to maintain a sense of well-being, which can result in drug addiction.
2. Method by which nervous system reduces or inhibits responsiveness during repeated stimulation.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Rats with a long period of contextual habituation were randomly distributed among the following two groups: pre-exposed (PE) and non-pre-exposed (NPE) to the taste.
(The anacoluthon in the period, with [phrase omitted] opening the conclusion, will not result unfamiliar to any reader of Aristotle.) If the argument runs as I claim, its premisses guarantee only the first element of the definiens: "if character results from habituation, habituation in turn via repetition of movements imposed from without eventually renders something capable of itself activating movement, and repetition of movements imposed from without on inanimate beings never issues in such result, then character must belong to a soul." The other elements of the definiens may be implied in the reasoning in the way Woods (1992, p.99) claims, but are made explicit only in II 1 1219b26-1220a12.
Modulation of trigeminal reflex excitability in migraine: effects of attention and habituation on the blink reflex.
Dix-Hallpike being negative, their symptoms resolved with vestibular habituation exercises itself.
The slight variation (1 or 2 km) we used to separate consecutive call-ins in one of our sampling designs also appeared ineffective in reducing habituation by lions.
For estimate of habituation, the sequence of the first series of responses recorded from hand and foot sites was divided into three blocks.
Habituation, he argues, is what determines what we consider to be harmonious.
I also know that most wildlife biologists would write off what is going on between Jake and Gronk as merely food habituation, and I suspect would have something pejorative to say about it.
We quickly adapt and get used to having new possessions so the novelty wears off - a process called habituation.
This natural approach plays on the fear instinct of the birds, which short circuits the learning process and prevents habituation.