habit

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habit

 [hab´it]
1. an action that has become automatic or characteristic by repetition.
2. predisposition; bodily temperament.

hab·it

(hab'it),
1. An act, behavioral response, practice, or custom established in one's repertoire by frequent repetition of the same activity.
See also: addiction.
2. A basic variable in the study of conditioning and learning used to designate a new response learned either by association or by being followed by a reward or reinforced event.
[L. habeo, pp. habitus, to have]

habit

(hăb′ĭt)
n.
a. A recurrent, often unconscious pattern of behavior that is acquired through frequent repetition: made a habit of going to bed early.
b. An established disposition of the mind or character: a pessimistic habit.
c. Customary manner or practice: an early riser by habit.
d. An addiction, especially to a narcotic drug.

habit

Vox populi A practice routinely or regularly performed by a person. See Bad habit, Good habit, Oral parafunctional habit.

hab·it

(hab'it)
1. An act, behavioral response, practice, or custom established in one's repertoire by frequent repetition of the same act.
See also: addiction
2. A basic variable in the study of conditioning and learning used to designate a new response learned either by association or by being followed by a reward or reinforced event.
See: conditioning, learning
3. An autonomic behavior integrated into a more complex pattern to function on a daily basis.
[L. habeo, pp. habitus, to have]

habit

A predictable sequence of reactions to common stimuli or behaviour occurring in particular contexts. Habits are conditioned, are often performed automatically and unconsciously, and avoid the need for decision-making.

habit

the general appearance and form of branching in plants. For example, dandelions can have an erect or prostrate habit, depending on location. See PHENOTYPIC PLASTICITY.

Habit

Referring to the particular set of physical and mental tensions present in any individual.
Mentioned in: Alexander Technique

hab·it

(hab'it)
An act, behavioral response, practice, or custom established in one's repertoire by frequent repetition of the same activity.
[L. habeo, pp. habitus, to have]

Patient discussion about habit

Q. Alcoholism becomes a habit in person? How does alcoholism becomes a habit in person?

A. If you think about alcohol all the time and you need it to feel good then it's a problem. If it's just a rare but pleasant action then there is no big disaster.
It may be a problem if the alcohol being the cause of depending (physical or corporial it is not just the same!)

Q. I am trying my best to reduce my habit towards drugs. I am trying my best to reduce my habit towards drugs. I got many advices to stay away from hard drugs. What's the difference between 'hard' and 'soft' drugs?

A. No difference

Q. is red meat bad for you??? and what about white meat like pork??? why is consider to be healthy eating vegie what are the advantages of this kind of diet ?

A. Eating a lot of red meat is considered to be a risk factor for developing colon cancer, and therefore it is advised not to eat too much of it. On the other hand, a diet rich with vegetables and fruit is considered very good because of the high fiber content, which is very benefitial for your gastrointestinal system. A diet poor with high fiber products is also considered a risk factor for the developement of colon cancer. White meat has a high content of fat and cholesterol, and is also not very recommended to be eating a lot of.

More discussions about habit
References in periodicals archive ?
In the stipulation, "Judge Singbush admitted that (1) 'since his election in 1991, [he] has been habitually tardy for hearings, first appearances, and trials for which he was the presiding judge'; (2) 'when tardy, [he] was often tardy for more than 15 minutes'; (3) '[his] tardiness inconveniences and economically burdens lawyers, litigants, and the judicial system'; [and] (4) 'the majority of the times [he] was late to [c]ourt were without good cause ...,'" the court opinion said.
That text establishes that migrant workers are in principle subject to the legislation of the member state in which they are employed, while posted or temporary workers remain subject to the legislation of the country where they habitually work (and not the state where they effectively work).
edited at the However I suggest that all bad drivers also speed habitually and, in addition to speeding, many will also be seen, for example, tailgating, driving aggressively, overtaking dangerously and so on.
"What was particularly interesting is that this wasn't driven by women who were snoring before they got pregnant; in fact, the majority started habitually snoring only after they reached the second trimester," she said.
Most patients habitually sit with a poor posture, with the lower portion of the back arched out instead of arched inward....
ha*bit*u*al*ly \-w[schwa]-l[macron over e]\ adverb <He is habitually late.>
A team of researchers from across seven European countries found that people who habitually consume oily fish at least once a week are 50% less likely to have wet-AMD than those who ate it less often.
We habitually ignore our vocation to point to things eternal in favour of worrying about the purely temporal.
And on the issue of pay for teachers--an issue on which the Democrats habitually sell out to the teachers' union--he has coupled a call for higher salaries with a demand that teachers be accountable for their performance.
This is a guy who decorated his own apartment, drinks heavily, habitually deflects attention by asking questions, and beds women but never talks about commitment.
Babies generally learn better, she observes, because as adults age, they typically "gain conductive efficiency but lose plasticity." In other words, mature persons tend to either perform tasks habitually or focus on them single-mindedly.
Previous studies examining individual differences correlates of one noctcaelador measure, the Noctcaelador Inventory (Kelly, 2004a), among student samples have found the construct to be related to habitually attaining less sleep (Kelly & Rose, 2005), artistic and investigative vocational interests (Kelly, 2005), openness to experience (Kelly, 2004b), and a preference for spending time outdoors (Kelly & Kelly, 2005).