guttation


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Related to guttation: Hydathodes
Guttationclick for a larger image
Fig. 184 Guttation . Transverse section of a saxifrage leaf.

guttation

the emergence of water from the endings of leaf veins, usually occurring at night when TRANSPIRATION is low or absent. Guttation is thus a method of exuding excess water and involves special water pores called HYDATHODES at leaf tips which, unlike normal STOMATA, are not able to control their aperture size. The process is common in low-growing plants such as grasses.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tapper, "Peramine and other fungal alkaloids are exuded in the guttation fluid of endophyte-infected grasses," Phytochemistry, vol.
Molecular aspect of guttation : involvement of contractile
After one or two applications, plants grown in treated soil may produce toxic pollen, nectar and guttation droplets for more than two seasons.
This washes dew and guttation fluid from leaf surfaces.
In the field, we inoculated plants when they reached the fourth true-leaf stage, after irrigating with about 12 mm of water during the two previous days to promote guttation on the day of inoculation, and damaging the trichomes on the leaf surface by brushing the plants with a wooden stake (20 cm long and 2 cm wide) mounted at the end of an aluminum handle (60 cm long).
This slow exudation of liquid water is called guttation.
The exit of this xylem water, termed guttation, results in the formation of small droplets in the vicinity of the hydathodes.
guttation: Exudation of liquid water from hydathodes fed by vascular xylem traces.
Shortly after sunrise hoses can be tied between two turf vehicles and dragged across the field to knock dew and guttation off the leaves.
Additionally, guttation and exudation of moisture from leaves is a function of soil moisture and plant water status (Taiz and Zeiger, 1991).
guttation The slow exudation of liquid water from the hydathodes of a leaf.
In some extant angiosperms, guttation occurs primarily in the young leaves, whereas older leaves do not consistently express guttation (e.g., Glenn & Takeda, 1989).