gustducin


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gust·duc·in

(gŭst'dus-in),
A protein messenger in taste buds that is activated in response to sweet and bitter tastes; gustducin is a G-protein α-subunit.
[L. gustus, taste, + duco, to lead, induce, + -in]

gustducin

A protein that is released when the taste receptors in the mouth detect a bitter compound. This protein triggers a cascade of reactions that finally sends sensory messages to the brain cause the experience of a bitter taste. Gustducin blockers have been developed in the expectation that a food additive might remove unpleasant flavours from foods. This may be expected to exacerbate the obesity pandemic in the Western world.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chief among taste-associated G-proteins is gustducin, which comprises Ga and Gpy subunits.
Interestingly, the taste G-protein gustducin does not appear to be involved [32].
Rozengurt, "Colocalization of the a-subunit of gustducin with PYY and GLP-1 in L cells of human colon," The American Journal of Physiology--Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, vol.
Theodorakis et al., "Gutexpressed gustducin and taste receptors regulate secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1," Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol.
Researchers found gustducin, a protein that gets the message going when the mouth's sweet, bitter or umami receptors are hit, in some gut and pancreas cells in rats.
Prof Shirazi-Beechey said: "We found that the sweet taste receptor and the taste protein, gustducin, are present in the taste cells of the gut.
Linguagen is developing bitter-blocker compounds based on gustducin, a taste-specific protein discovered in 1991 by Linguagen founder Robert Margolskee.
The protein, gustducin, triggers a series of reactions that result in a nerve message to the brain saying something tastes ``bitter''.
However, those proteins weren't made by the taste cells that produce the signaling protein, called gustducin, that's known to be important for recognizing bitterness, says Ryba.
Molecular neurobiologists have discovered a new protein, gustducin, that seems to reside only in the taste buds and may act as a messenger for bitter-taste signals.
Even within particular lineages, there are cases where the function of a G[alpha] protein may be difficult to predict based on the class to which it belongs: for example, taste receptors in vertebrates interact with gustducins, a family of G[alpha]; proteins related closely to the transducins expressed in rod and cone photoreceptors (McLaughlin et al., 1992).