gustducin


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gust·duc·in

(gŭst'dus-in),
A protein messenger in taste buds that is activated in response to sweet and bitter tastes; gustducin is a G-protein α-subunit.
[L. gustus, taste, + duco, to lead, induce, + -in]

gustducin

A protein that is released when the taste receptors in the mouth detect a bitter compound. This protein triggers a cascade of reactions that finally sends sensory messages to the brain cause the experience of a bitter taste. Gustducin blockers have been developed in the expectation that a food additive might remove unpleasant flavours from foods. This may be expected to exacerbate the obesity pandemic in the Western world.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gustducin is a taste-cell-specific G protein closely related to the transducins.
Even within particular lineages, there are cases where the function of a G[alpha] protein may be difficult to predict based on the class to which it belongs: for example, taste receptors in vertebrates interact with gustducins, a family of G[alpha]; proteins related closely to the transducins expressed in rod and cone photoreceptors (McLaughlin et al.
T1R3 and gustducin in gut sense sugars to regulate expression of Na+-glucose cotransporter 1.
Nearly 10 years later, scientists established that gut cells using gustducin were "tasting" too.
Mice without working gustducin also released less of the hormone.
Prof Shirazi-Beechey said: "We found that the sweet taste receptor and the taste protein, gustducin, are present in the taste cells of the gut.
Linguagen is developing bitter-blocker compounds based on gustducin, a taste-specific protein discovered in 1991 by Linguagen founder Robert Margolskee.
The protein, gustducin, triggers a series of reactions that result in a nerve message to the brain saying something tastes ``bitter''.
However, those proteins weren't made by the taste cells that produce the signaling protein, called gustducin, that's known to be important for recognizing bitterness, says Ryba.
Cells that make any of the newly found mammalian receptor proteins also produce all the others and gustducin.
Molecular neurobiologists have discovered a new protein, gustducin, that seems to reside only in the taste buds and may act as a messenger for bitter-taste signals.