nitrocellulose

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pyroxylin

 [pi-rok´sĭ-lin]
a product of the action of a mixture of nitric and sulfuric acids on cotton; used to make collodion.

py·rox·y·lin

(pi-rok'si-lin),
Consists chiefly of cellulose tetranitrate, obtained by the action of nitric and sulfuric acids on cotton; used in the preparation of collodion.
[pyro- + G. xylon, wood]

nitrocellulose

/ni·tro·cel·lu·lose/ (ni″tro-sel´ūl-ōs) pyroxylin.

nitrocellulose (nitr)

[-sel′yəlōs]
a mixture of nitrate esters of cellulose made by treating cotton with nitric and sulfuric acids. Solutions in a mixture of ether and alcohol are used as "plastic skin" under the name of collodion. Also called pyroxylin.

nitrocellulose

pyroxylin, a base which is dissolved in alcohol or ether to form collodion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed it was fully sixteen years before Sir Frederick Abel proposed safe methods for making guncotton.
A medical examiner's report stated that traces of nitrocellulose - an explosive material also known as guncotton - was found on shrapnel pulled from the victim.
Nitrocellulose (non-black) propellant first appeared on the scene in the 1840s with the invention of guncotton, which involved treating cellulose (cotton) with hot sulfuric and nitric acids.
All grenades had fuses of one sort or another and many of the early types were homemade affairs consisting of guncotton or some other type of explosive surrounded by nails, scrap metal, whatever was at hand, with the whole mess stuffed into the center of a discarded jam tin, in which a regular old fashion slow fuse was placed.
A medical examiner's report stated that traces of nitrocellulose -- an explosive material also known as guncotton -- was found on shrapnel pulled from the victim.
In 1884, it was discovered that the fibrous guncotton could be gelatinized by treating it with a mixture of alcohol and ether.
303-inch Cordite (Mark I)" featured the black powder round's drawn case and 215-grain bullet, but was charged with 31 grains (or 60 strands) or Cordite, a spaghetti-like propellant made from nitroglycerine, guncotton and mineral jelly.