gum boil


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Related to gum boil: gingival abscess

boil

 [boil]
a painful nodule formed in the skin by circumscribed inflammation of the dermis and subcutaneous tissue, enclosing a central slough or “core.” Called also furuncle. Boils occur most frequently on the neck and buttocks, although they may develop wherever friction or irritation, or a scratch or break in the skin, allows the bacteria resident on the surface to penetrate the outer layer of the skin. A carbuncle is a group of interconnected boils arising in a cluster of hair follicles.
Cause. Most boils and carbuncles are caused by Staphylococcus aureus. When these bacteria gain entrance to the skin, the infection settles in the hair follicles or the sebaceous glands. To combat the infection, large numbers of leukocytes travel to the site and attack the invading bacteria. Some bacteria and white cells are killed and they and their liquefied products form pus. The body's defenses may succeed in overcoming the invaders so that the boil subsides by itself, or the pus may build up pressure against the skin surface so that it ruptures, drains, and heals.

Boils most often afflict healthy persons but occasionally their appearance is a sign that the resistance is low, usually as the result of poor nutrition or illness. Patients with recurrent boils should be suspected of being chronic staphylococcal carriers. The nose is the most common carriage site.
Treatment. In most cases a single boil is not serious and will respond to incision and drainage. Systemic antibiotics are also sometimes indicated. Although complications are rare, a boil on or above the upper lip, on the nose or scalp, or in the outer ear can be serious because in these areas infection has easy access to the brain. Other danger zones are the armpit, the groin, and the breast of a woman who is nursing. If bacteria from a boil enter the bloodstream, septicemia may result (see blood poisoning).
gum boil parulis.

gum boil

see dental fistula.