gum


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gum

 [gum]
1. a mucilaginous excretion of various plants.
karaya gum (sterculia gum) see karaya gum.

gum

(gŭm),
1. The dried exuded sap from a number of trees and shrubs, forming an amorphous brittle mass; it usually forms a mucilaginous solution in water and is often used as a suspending agent in liquid preparations of insoluble drugs.
2. ☆ official atlternate term for gingiva
3. Water-soluble glycans, often containing uronic acids, found in many plants.

gum 1

(gŭm)
n.
1.
a. Any of various viscous substances that are exuded by certain plants and trees and dry into water-soluble, noncrystalline, brittle solids.
b. A similar plant exudate, such as a resin.
c. Any of various adhesives made from such exudates or other sticky substance.
2. A substance resembling the viscous substance exuded by certain plants, as in stickiness.

gum 2

(gŭm)
n.
The firm connective tissue covered by mucous membrane that envelops the alveolar arches of the jaw and surrounds the bases of the teeth. Also called gingiva.
tr.v. gummed, gumming, gums
To chew (food) with toothless gums.

gum

Herbal medicine
A tree from Africa that produces a resinous sap, which has been used for treating sore throat, coughs and diarrhoea.
 
Vox populi
See Chewing gum.

gum

Tobacco control See Nicotine gum.

gum

(gŭm)
1. The dried exuded sap from a variety of trees and shrubs, forming an amorphous brittle mass; usually forms a mucilaginous solution in water.
2. Synonym(s): gingiva.
[L. gummi]

GUM

Abbrev for genitourinary medicine. This specialty has absorbed and replaced the former discipline known as venereology.

gum

(gŭm)
1. Synonym(s): gingiva.
2. Dried exuded sap from various trees and shrubs, forming an amorphous brittle mass; usually forms a mucilaginous solution in water and is often used as a suspending agent in liquid preparations of insoluble drugs.
3. Water-soluble glycans, often containing uronic acids, found in many plants.
[L. gummi]

Patient discussion about gum

Q. What are the opportunities to restore gums? My gum on the lower jaw gets less and less, opening the roots of my teeth. Is there any technology or recurement to stop it and, hopefully, draw back?

A. Treatment of receding gums start with treating the cause - improving overall oral hygiene, including brushing habits (too powerful brushing may damage the gums), as well as periodic tooth cleaning at the dentist.

More sever situation may necessitate treatments done by a dentist. Consulting one may be wise.

You may read more here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/imagepages/1136.htm

Q. Is it dangerous to swallow a bubble gum? My 4 year old child always swallows his chewing gum and I am worried that it can harm him

A. what about when your 45 yrs old and still swallowing gum? we had a debate with my older sister about this.

More discussions about gum
References in periodicals archive ?
But there are simply ways that can either help prevent gum boils or support medications in treating the infection.
However, the growing usage of substitutes of guar gum like xanthan gum and locust bean gums, is restraining the growth of market.
The Sudan and its neighbouring countries depend entirely on the Gum Arabic Belt for charcoal and firewood in lieu of petroleum or gas products.
Gum Arabic commodity One of the important strategic resources which support economies of producers states, but suffer challenges , stand against to be the main resource and supporter of National Economy and Providing jobs .
Alternatively, the link between heart and gum diseases may be due to bacteria.
Antiseptic mouthwashes are available in different concentrations, designed to reduce the majority of bacteria near the gum line.
They found that mixing other substances with the gum, such as recycled plastic, made the bins stronger.
In this paper, the microwave-assisted hydrophobicity guar gum derivatives were synthesized and the effect of different factors on the derivative properties was studied.
One paper also found that munching on gum can help to alleviate stress, which, the study authors hypothesized, may be due to increased blood flow to the brain.
Exports of unprocessed and semi-processed gum arabic have almost tripled in the last 25 years, from an annual average of 35,000 tonnes in 19921994 to an annual average of 102,000 tonnes in 20142016.
Last June, the secretary-general of the Gum Arabic Council (GAC) Abdel-Magid Abdel-Gader, said revenues from exports of the gum Arabic in the first half of this year amounted to $45 million.
Growing application of gum arabic as tablet binders, film forming agent, and suspending agents in production of pharmaceuticals