guilt

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guilt

(gĭlt)
n.
1.
a. The fact of being responsible for the commission of an offense; moral culpability: The investigation uncovered the suspect's guilt.
b. Law The fact of having been found to have violated a criminal law; legal culpability: The jury's job is to determine the defendant's guilt or innocence.
c. Responsibility for a mistake or error: The guilt for the book's many typos lies with the editor.
2. Remorseful awareness of having done something wrong or violating a rule: Do you feel any guilt for forgetting my birthday? The dieter felt guilt for snacking between meals.
tr.v. guilted, guilting, guilts
1. To make or try to make (someone) feel guilty: My roommate guilted me for forgetting to wash the dishes.
2. To cause (someone) to do something by arousing feelings of guilt: My roommate guilted me into washing the dishes.

guilt

Psychiatry Emotion resulting from doing what one perceives of as wrong, thereby violating superego precepts; results in feelings of worthlessness and at times the need for punishment. See Shame.

guilt

A state of distress usually caused by the belief that one has contravened accepted moral, ethical, religious or legal standards of behaviour. Early conditioning in such matters remains powerful throughout life and guilt may be experienced even when early precepts have been long-since been abandoned as illogical. A deep, and seemingly inappropriate, sense of guilt is often a feature of psychiatric disorder.
References in classic literature ?
``And thou, creature of guilt and misery,'' said Cedric, ``what became thy lot on the death of thy ravisher?''
I am not one of your enemies, I believed you guiltless, notwithstanding every evidence, until I heard that you had yourself declared your guilt. That report, you say, is false; and be assured, dear Justine, that nothing can shake my confidence in you for a moment, but your own confession."
She confined herself, or tried to confine herself, to the simple, indubitable family misery which must envelop all, if it were indeed a matter of certified guilt and public exposure.
Our son, our innocent boy, on whom His anger fell before his birth, is in this place in peril of his life-- brought here by your guilt; yes, by that alone, as Heaven sees and knows, for he has been led astray in the darkness of his intellect, and that is the terrible consequence of your crime.'
It is one thing to be morally convinced (as I am) that Miserrimus Dexter is the man who ought to have been tried for the murder at Gleninch; and it is another thing, at this distance of time, to lay our hands on the plain evidence which can alone justify anything like a public assertion of his guilt. There, as I see it, is the insuperable difficulty in the case.
She rejoiced in his being cleared from some part of his imputed guilt;--she was sorry for him;--she wished him happy.
But suppose the worst: you have no right to say that the guilt of her crime lies with him, and that he ought to bear the punishment.