guilt

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guilt

(gĭlt)
n.
1.
a. The fact of being responsible for the commission of an offense; moral culpability: The investigation uncovered the suspect's guilt.
b. Law The fact of having been found to have violated a criminal law; legal culpability: The jury's job is to determine the defendant's guilt or innocence.
c. Responsibility for a mistake or error: The guilt for the book's many typos lies with the editor.
2. Remorseful awareness of having done something wrong or violating a rule: Do you feel any guilt for forgetting my birthday? The dieter felt guilt for snacking between meals.
tr.v. guilted, guilting, guilts
1. To make or try to make (someone) feel guilty: My roommate guilted me for forgetting to wash the dishes.
2. To cause (someone) to do something by arousing feelings of guilt: My roommate guilted me into washing the dishes.

guilt

Etymology: AS, gylt, delinquency
a feeling caused by tension between the ego and superego when one falls below the standards set for oneself, or a remorseful awareness of having done something wrong.

guilt

Psychiatry Emotion resulting from doing what one perceives of as wrong, thereby violating superego precepts; results in feelings of worthlessness and at times the need for punishment. See Shame.

guilt

A state of distress usually caused by the belief that one has contravened accepted moral, ethical, religious or legal standards of behaviour. Early conditioning in such matters remains powerful throughout life and guilt may be experienced even when early precepts have been long-since been abandoned as illogical. A deep, and seemingly inappropriate, sense of guilt is often a feature of psychiatric disorder.
References in periodicals archive ?
He probes the nature of guilt that African American men feel as a result of the societal stereotypes that mark them as villains, as outlaws in his collection of poems innocent (1998) and in his recent novel The Multicultiboho Sideshow (1999).
It delves deep into the heart of Pate's novels and poetry as it explores themes in his work such as guilt and innocence.
I wanted them to know that I felt a certain guilt, one that I accepted as genuinely my own, that I wanted to grow from.
And, actually, the existence of innocence in black boys -- or, rather, the moment at which guilt is bestowed upon black boys is very interesting to me right now.
Link: In every one of your novels, you develop conflicting ideas such as guilt and innocence, gentleness and rage, hero and outlaw, wholeness and emptiness, and, in West of Rehobeth, hope and despair.
The book's title suggests that the poems are about innocence, yet the poems are actually about outlaws, guilt, and shame, with the exception of the last poem, "innocent.