guilty

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guilty

(gĭl′tē)
adj. guilt·ier, guilt·iest
1.
a. Responsible for a reprehensible act; culpable.
b. Law Found to have violated a criminal law by a jury or judge.
c. Deserving blame, as for an error: guilty of misjudgment.
2. Suffering from or prompted by a sense of guilt: a guilty conscience.

guilt′i·ly adv.
guilt′i·ness n.

Patient discussion about guilty

Q. I feel guilty about my health caring.Can things I do (or not do) as parent, cause autism in my child? I am a parent who is planning to send my child to school for the first time. : I feel guilty about my health caring. Can things I do (or not do) as parent, cause autism in my child?

A. If everyone feels guilty like you about their health, then this whole earth will hold perfect humans with complete health. I wish you the same. Autism is a biomedical disorder. We don't know if there are any things that a parent can do or not do, conclusively, will determine whether their child gets autism or not. In fact, there is no association with anything that a parent can do and their child ending up with autism. Most of the evidence right now points to there being a very strong genetic predisposition in most cases of autism, but not all.

More discussions about guilty
References in periodicals archive ?
For this reason, parents' psychological control of guiltiness can cause psychological problems in girls of this age group.
In 94 cases the guiltiness came out because the couples asked for legitimization for their already existing children (20).
In the guiltiness of the survivor, the death of the other [l'autre] is my affair.
The point here then is that Averroes is trying to establish a firm line between those who can legitimately be killed and those who have immunity from attack, and doing so on the basis of guiltiness. Today many would readily dispute his criteria for guiltiness.
In a conversation that manages to talk around its real subject--Arthur's guiltiness over his relations with Hetty--Irwine describes "inward suffering" as "the worst form of Nemesis" (217) and then proceeds to lecture Arthur on forms of causality: "Consequences are unpitying.
193, 203-04 (1985) (finding that a limiting instruction had no significant effect on the jury, except to "lower [the] guiltiness rating on a lesser included offense"); Saul M.
A pedagogics of forgiveness is not, however, a curriculum that attempts to vilify parts of history, but rather presents both sides of the story: the gloriousness as well as the guiltiness of "our" past.
In disallowing "GUILT," Coleridge confirms the demotion of guiltiness encouraged by philosophical Necessity.
The measure of guilt is proportionate to the development of conscience, a sensitivity toward injustice and recognition of one's conspiring in it, entailing undertones of both defilement and sin: "Guiltiness is never anything else than the anticipated chastisement itself, internalized and already weighing upon consciousness; and as dread is from the beginning the way of internalization of defilement itself, in spite of the radical externality of the evil, guilt is a moment contemporaneous with defilement itself." (46) So there exists a circle between guilt and defilement, a circle held in tension by sin, whether actual or not.
That is, what was the extent of the guiltiness of his state of mind?
He saw her in the doorway, saw her eyes overflowing with gratitude, so intense, he averted his own in guiltiness.
In Augustinian theology, divine domination and human guiltiness legitimate human relationships of domination: the Righteous One stands against all others.