guarded

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guarded

 [gahr´ded]
of uncertain outcome; said of a patient condition.
References in periodicals archive ?
He speaks with the friendly guardedness of somebody used to fielding questions they either don't want to answer, or have no answer for.
You give your heart 100 per cent and loyalty is everything to you Sexual adventure is one thing, true love entirely another, so you have an emotional guardedness about you until you get the measure of a potential partner.
In order to provide themselves some psychological protection from emotional and physical exploitation at the hands of whites and black men, black women engaged in elaborate forms of masking, guardedness, and impression management.
We implemented a closed-group format to promote the ability for group members to develop safe relationships over the duration of the group term and reduce the elements of guardedness and distrust that can be familiar within correctional settings.
And what can come of this curtailed self but guardedness, self-consciousness, worry, and curtailed hope, if also art.
Aloysius, teachers noted the openness of their younger students in contrast with the guardedness of their middle school students.
The guardedness moderated as the chicks grew older and more capable.
We're chatting at swanky The Grove hotel in Hertfordshire, where bootcamp auditions are being filmed - and Cheryl is known for her guardedness in interviews.
The adult studies have contributed to the perception of rural areas as unsupportive of diversity; an America-wide study of GLBT baby boomers (n=1201) found that rural individuals reported lower levels of outness and increased guardedness with others than those from urban areas (Lee & Quam, 2013), and a small Texan focus group study of GLBT adults identified that the perception that the rural community was unsupportive was an obstacle to community work (Drumheller & McQuay, 2010).
It's their fear, or guardedness, or past bad experience that keeps them from playing the referral game.
In a first-time clinical setting, guardedness can be misinterpreted by clinicians as paranoia (Whaley, 1998).
U] Unlikeliness (unlikely responses suggesting feigned distress), and [G] Guardedness (defensive denial).