grub

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grub

(grŭb),
Wormlike larva or maggot of certain insects, particularly in the orders Coleoptera, Diptera, and Hymenoptera, and the genus Hypoderma.

grub

(grŭb)
n.
The thick wormlike larva of certain beetles and other insects.

grub′ber n.

grub

an insect larva lacking legs; a maggot.
References in classic literature ?
'Unfortunately, these stories were somewhat disturbed by the unlooked-for reappearance of Gabriel Grub himself, some ten years afterwards, a ragged, contented, rheumatic old man.
In the latest epidode of his TV show Gordon Ramsay Uncharted, chef Monique Fiso told him how the grubs - the larval form of the longhorn beetle - were a delicacy and insisted they tasted like peanut butter.
Your lawn may or may not have a problem with grubs this year, so you do not need to automatically treat for them.
Q I HAVE found some grubs in my border soil that I think could be vine weevils.
RACE meetings at Salisbury and Epsom were abandoned this week due to, of all things, an infestation of chafer grubs. This has led to questions being asked of the British Horseracing Authority, namely, what the hell is a chafer grub"?
SALISBURY yesterday became the second course in two days to be forced to cancel its meeting owing to an infestation of chafer grubs.
Several insecticides are recommended for the management of white grubs, but in fact the insecticides do not provide satisfactory control unless used in very high dose, which in turn becomes hazardous and uneconomic besides being unsustainable Santos et al.
Of course, the deluxe kit contains jigs from 1/16- up to 3/8-ounce and grubs in 10 colors (now what would you pay for such a kit?) The instructions read: "Choose weight to match depth.
This year its volunteer staff will be wearing wellies supplied by national boot company Grubs.
THE DZG meerkats had a tree-mendous time recently digging for grubs when old logs were added to their outdoor den.
Last week, Dave Moran asked for information on the fat grey grubs he discovered on his allotment.
The most effective method is biological and involves drenching the soil with nematodes that eat the grubs. The soil needs to be above 5C for this to work so it may be too late this year but certainly worth doing in the spring and repeating as necessary.