growth rate of population

growth rate of pop·u·la·tion

a measure of population change in the absence of migration, comprising addition of newborns and subtraction of deaths; the result is known as the natural rate of increase of the population; it is the difference between the crude birth rate and the crude death rate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Table-3 depicts that the decadal growth rate of both the total food grain production (13.49 percent) and that of combined Rice-Wheat production (9.11 percent) from 2001-02 to 201011 is much less than the decadal growth rate of population (17.64 percent).
The growth rate of population in India in 2001-11 is 17.64%.
These are: an alarming growth rate of population, abysmally low literacy rate, wide-spread unemployment, deteriorating economic environment, largest dependency rate, poor physical infrastructure, persistent energy crisis, heavy import bills, inconsistent policies, acute shortage of public and private sector resources for research and development, lack of technical institutions and experts, undue import and export of domestic agriculture products, wastage of mineral and atomic resources, lack of industrial development, luxurious spending.
The annual growth rate of population estimated at 3.3%.
The growth rate of population for India in the last decade was 17.64%.
In addition, we also replace the rate of change in labor input by the growth rate of population. These changes yield the following growth equation:
Growth rate of population declined during 1990-2000 because fertility rate declined rapidly during this period and life expectancy stagnated.
The only reason is the high growth rate of population of Pakistan as compared to the other countries of the world.
Growth rate of population is measured as annual population growth rate.
We have developed an ad hoc model including basic determinants of economic growth as follows: GDP growth (gross domestic product)= |(foreign loans, foreign aid, foreign direct investment, human capital, growth rate of labor force, growth rate of population, government spending, openness to international trade, trade openness indicator, economic freedom, business climate, inflation, political regime (political rights and civil liberties)).
The annual growth rate of population was 2.02% from 1952 to 1975, and 1.33% from 1978 to 1996.
A key plank of his theory, for example, is the link between the growth rate of population and inflation rates.