groupthink


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groupthink

(gro͞op′thĭngk′)
n.
The act or practice of reasoning or decision-making by a group, especially when characterized by uncritical acceptance or conformity to prevailing points of view.
References in periodicals archive ?
That is a surprising claim, given that my essay surveys the data on how ideologically monolithic the academy is, and Skoble agrees with my assessment of university groupthink in his reply.
Often neglected, though, is the importance of avoiding groupthink by making young people grapple with conflicting ideas and test them against each other through healthy debate in a free and open society.
Even The New York Times, which has led the media groupthink on Russian guilt, initially published the surprised reaction from correspondent Scott Shane who wrote: "What is missing from the public report is what many Americans most eagerly anticipated: hard evidence to back up the agencies' claims that the Russian government engineered the election attack.
This article speaks to the 'Groupthink' mentality and the importance on how to avoid that trap.
Beware of "groupthink." A behavior researched by psychologist Irving Janis, groupthink is what happens in small and cohesive groups "when critical thinking typically loses to the forces of consensus." It's the greatest obstacle to moral courage, Manji says.
Avoid "groupthink" - Avoid chaotic collective decision making.
The topics include how to become a charismatic leader, the importance of the mission statement, the advantages and disadvantages of the Sprinkler Strategy, a discussion on Groupthink, how to recruit the best talents, nine excellent creativity techniques, how to conduct efficient meetings (and save time), three reasons why you won't be a successful manager, and how to treat your emails efficiently (and save time).
Groupthink, a term created by psychologist Irving Janis, is what happens when people make a bad decision out of desire for group consensus.
A howl of agony echoes through a distant gorge, and soon merges with the screams of the persecutors and the persecuted alike In "Mountain Cry," a bluntly effective condemnation of Intolerant groupthink that reveals just how quickly the Inhabitants of a remote village will turn on their own.