group dynamics


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dynamics

 [di-nam´iks]
1. the scientific study of forces in action; a phase of mechanics.
2. the motivating or driving forces, physical or moral, in any field.
group dynamics the forces that underlie group interaction; the interactions among group members.

group dy·nam·ics

a term used to represent the study of underlying features of group behavior, for example, motives, attitudes; it is concerned with group change rather than with static characteristics.

group dynamics

Etymology: Fr, groupe + Gk, dynamis, force
the interactions and relationships that take place among group members as well as between the group and the rest of society. It includes interdependence of group members, collective problem solving and decision making, and group conformity.

group dynamics

Psychiatry The interactions and interrelations among members of a therapy group and between members and therapist; effective use of GD is essential in group treatment

group dy·nam·ics

(grūp dī-namiks)
The study of underlying features of group behavior, e.g., motives, attitudes; concerned with group change rather than with static characteristics.

group dynamics

the ongoing social interactions and processes within a group.
References in periodicals archive ?
22-24 Though explicit concern for adult learning principles was not considered in our study while designing the questionnaire, adult learning principles were considered specifically in designing the CBL approach with deliberate avoidance of pedagogic approach and a positive response in both learning environment, process and group dynamics in an earlier study.
Likewise, by understanding group dynamics, estimators can serve different roles within the group (e.
The purpose is to test theories about group dynamics, power and rebellion - and to study how social systems work.
The aim is to test theories about group dynamics, power and rebellion.
Insisting that the charismatic leader in these plays should not be studied in isolation but rather in the context of group dynamics, the book identifies some paradoxes central to the charismatic experience.
A study of psychological effect of group dynamics suggests there would be fewer hung juries if they were made smaller.
McClure then progresses to the group stage model, chaos and self-organization in groups, two chapters on group leadership, conflict, the use of the group metaphor as a strange attractor, regressive or limit cycle groups, generative and transpersonal groups, and some thoughts on the teaching of group dynamics.
Based on field observations in pro-feminist, progressive, mixed-gender, mixed-race social movement organisations, this article examines organisational decision-marking processes and interpersonal and group dynamics.
It is not critical that the facilitator have a marketing background (as long as you do), but it is critical that the facilitator be skilled in managing group dynamics and facilitating discussions among numerous participants who often have conflicting opinions and goals.
They include attitude, work ethic, problem solving, team building, and group dynamics.
But while the name-dropping may have changed, Band's take on group dynamics among a circle of 20-something gay men has proved surprisingly resilient, It's no coincidence that both Hearts and Punks (each appearing at gay film festivals this summer, then opening in the fall) borrow Band's birthday party premise for their opening scenes, Crowley's play--an immediate hit when it first opened off-Broadway in 1968--serves up a veritable roll call of timeless gay types: the self-pitying party host, Michael; his bookish, self-reliant confidant, Donald; the flamingly nelly Emory; the sharp-tongued Harold; "straight-acting" teacher Hank and his sometimes--straying lover, Larry; sexy, black Bernard; twinkle-hustler Cowboy; and married closet case Alan.
The Chicago archdiocese's lay-ministry training program includes classes in theology, interpersonal skills, and group dynamics as well as sessions on social justice.