group cohesion

group cohesion

a group's tendency to stick together in its pursuit of common goals. Also known as team cohesion.
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Therefore, group cohesion is particularly important in these settings and it has been associated with the performance of teams or workgroups (Bass, Avolio, Jung, & Yair, 2003; Oliver et al.
Furthermore, research shows extreme group cohesion is not an asset and group diversity can mitigate excessive commitment to social cohesion.
The investigation of paternalistic leadership, motivational climate, group cohesion and satisfaction between Taiwan and Chinese basketball players [In Chinese].
It has been known for some time that mammals sustain social bonds by showing affiliative behavior, which promotes group cohesion and cooperation among members.
From our working experience with different sports groups and teams, inclusively in handball, we can assert there are teams that, although made up of extremely valuable athletes, don't obtain the expected results, by meeting difficulties when they have to create the group cohesion and reach the intended performances.
Conflict in the power/control stage is one of the greatest threats to group cohesion.
The second most frequent theme was group cohesion (n = 46), followed by mentoring (n = 35), transformation (n = 25), self-care (n = 19), and cultural competence (n = 14).
Members are very supportive of one another, and this sense of group cohesion provides the motivation to keep going, as people are doing more than simply taking part in a fitness session.
Although primarily concerned with the composition of Canadian electoral bodies and the factors that lead to group representation, such as group cohesion and resources, the authors do include some consideration of the impact of representational diversity on policy outcomes.
It would seem more relevant for Fritz to address the issue of primary group cohesion in German army units, as he does in Frontsoldaten [1995], which disputes Omer Bartov's argument in Hitler's Army [1991] about ideology replacing camaraderie.
Constructive feed-back helps build group cohesion, as well as mobilize the unique resources within the group.
Mr Hoon said last night: ``Under the conditions of a high intensity, close-quarter battle, group cohesion becomes of much greater significance to team performance and failure can have farreaching consequences.