gross

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gross

 [grōs]
coarse or large; visible to the naked eye.

Gross

(grōs),
Ludwik, 20th-century U.S. oncologist. See: Gross virus, Gross leukemia virus.

gross

(grōs),
Coarse or large; large enough to be visible to the naked eye; macroscopic.
[L. grossus, thick]

gross

(grōs)
1. coarse or large.
2. visible to the naked eye without the use of magnification.

gross

Etymology: OFr, gros, large
1 macroscopic, as in gross pathology; the study of tissue changes without magnification by a microscope.
2 large or obese. Compare microscopic.

gross

(grōs)
Coarse or large; large enough to be visible to the naked eye.
[L. grossus, thick]

gross

coarse or large; visible to the naked eye.

gross energy
total energy of a feed as measured by direct calorimetry.
gross income
total income before costs have been deducted.
gross margin
total returns from an enterprise minus the variable costs incurred by the enterprise.
References in periodicals archive ?
Apple's gross margin will recover beginning with the March quarter and return to greater than 40 percent gross margin as early as the June quarter.
Whatever the business situation, gross margin is a key indicator of business success.
Since the start of the financial crisis, the pressure on gross margins in the Middle East Region has been intense.
Careful planning and forecasting are important tools so that levels of production and stock are enough to meet demand but not so high that the businesses have to offer a discount on unsold goods or throw out perishable stock after its sell-by-date, as this will also adversely impact gross margins.
The value-based pricing model is a customer/market-driven product design with a target price that can be sold successfully, helping gross margin.
This process is critical to gross margin maximization because new, leading-edge products will command a higher gross margin.
This dissipates the product's sales and gross margin opportunities.
This approach results in a product distribution in which 80 percent of the gross margin is derived from 20 percent or less of the products.
An effective customer management process has a number of additional attributes, such as: a target market and customer identification model; growth, retention and pruning strategies; mutually helpful operating and escalation policies; a mutually useful and communications-intensive customer management program; ownership support and service programs; and customer service and technical service staff compensation tied to gross margin measurements.
Achieving gross margin objectives through alignment, the second area related to sales effectiveness -- admittedly tough and emotional -- means the sales organization must be aligned with the company's gross margin objectives and must assume ownership of gross margins.