greensickness


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

greensickness

(grēn′sĭk′nĭs)
n.

green′sick′ adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The concept of greensickness may indeed be present in the play but Shakespeare's contribution to social development is that he shows his characters battling against conventional knowledge and prejudices.
For example, in Partridge's tract, remedies were given for both greensickness and for an absence of bloody flux, but they were not regarded as the same, greensickness being a name used to describe the absence of menstruation in females and the patients requiring a bloody flux being identified as male.
Sujata Iyengar divides her book into three parts: "Ethiopian Histories," "Whiteness Visible," and "Travail Narratives." In these sections, she analyzes a wide range of skin-color phenomena represented in early modern literature: blackness, whiteness, blushing, blanching, sunburning, cosmetic face-painting, and greensickness, to name the most important.
Collington, "'Like One Thar Fears Robbing': Cuckoldry Anxiety and The Two Gentlemen of Verona"; Ursula Porter, "Greensickness in Romeo and Juliet: Considerations on a Sixteenth-Century Disease of Virgins"; Carol Lansing, "Girls in Trouble in Late Medieval Bologna"; John Carmi Parsons, "The Medieval Aristocratic Teenaged Female: Adolescent or Adult?"; and John Leland, "Leaving Town to Work for the Family: The Counter-Migration of Teenaged Servants in Fourteenth-Century England."