green tea


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green tea

A beverage prepared from the leaves of an eastern Asian evergreen shrub, Camellia sinensis, which is believed to have a carcinoprotective effect greater than that of black tea (which is produced from green tea by a fermentation process). Both green and black tea have epigallocatechin gallate, an antioxidant responsible for the alleged protective effect.

green tea

Popular health A beverage prepared from leaves of an eastern Asian evergreen shrub, Camellia sinensis. See Tea. Cf Caffeine, Coffee, Maté. ;.

green tea

(grēn tē)
Chinese and Japanese tea purported to have health benefits, including reduction of risk of certain cancers and improvement in rheumatoid arthritis, elevated cholesterol, cardiovascular disease, infections, and immune function.
References in periodicals archive ?
"When that occurs, the green tea loses its potential as an antioxidant.
A human study published in The Journal of the American Medical Association found that consuming 5 or more cups of green tea daily was associated with a 26% lower risk of cardiovascular death.
However, if you're drinking green tea for taste, tap water will yield the best cup, ensuring it's not too bitter.
Green tea, derived from leaves of Camilla sinensis, is rich in polyphenols including catechin, epicatechin gallate and epigallocatechin-3-gallate and has been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of metabolic disorders, including hypertension, obesity and cardiovascular disease.
It was more for personal use thenbut today there are about 47 acres of land in Draktenggewog under green tea plantation.
Green tea is widely consumed for its purported health benefits, but there have also been reports in the EU and beyond of possible harmful effects.
Everyone can also take their refreshing C2 experience further with varying flavor offers such as Classic Green Tea, Green Tea Apple, Green Tea Lemon, Green Tea Dalandan, Green Tea Melon and Red Tea Raspberry.
A number of studies have looked at possible links between green tea and cardiovascular disease.
But half of the participants also took 1,500 mg of green tea extract per day.
Research reveals that green tea has powerful properties that make it beneficial for lowering your risk of heart disease, stroke, and other cardiovascular problems.
Black and green tea contain phytochemicals shown to offer an array of health benefits.