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green

 [grēn]
1. a color between yellow and blue, produced by energy with wavelengths between 490 and 570 nm.
2. a dye or stain with this color.
indocyanine green a dye used intravenously in determination of blood volume and flow, cardiac output, and hepatic function.

green

(grēn),
A color between blue and yellow in the spectrum. For individual green dyes, see specific names.

green

(grēn)
1. a color between yellow and blue, produced by energy with wavelengths between 490 and 570 nm.
2. a dye or stain with this color.

indocyanine green  a dye used intravenously in determination of blood volume and flow, cardiac output, and hepatic function.
Drug slang A regional term for inferior quality marijuana, PCP, or ketamine
Global village Environmentally ‘correct’
Quackery A colour in the pseudoscience of colour therapy which is said to be mentally and physically soothing and regarded by colour ‘therapists’ as the master healer; it is said to disinfect and rebuild tissues, reduce blood pressure, treat stress, fatigue, and cancer, and provide hope
Vox populi A colour wavelength in the interval from 560 to 490 nm with a frequency interval of 540 to 610 THz

PDR

Physicians Desk Reference A book published annually that lists all ± 2500 US therapeutics requiring a physician prescription
PDR 7 color-coded sections
White Manufacturers' index, containing the company addresses and list of products
Pink Product name index, an alphabetical listing of the drugs by brand name
Blue Product classification, where drugs are subdivided into therapeutic classes
Yellow Generic and chemical name index
Multicolored Photographs of the most commonly prescribed tablets and capsules
White Product information, a reprint of the manufacturers' product inserts and
Green Diagnostic product information, a list of manufacturers of diagnostic tests used in office practice and the hospital; Cf Over-the-counter drugs  . ;.

green,

adj in Chinese medicine, a facial coloration that indicates poor, sluggish digestion, particularly when accompanied by a muddy look in the eyes.

green

The hue sensation evoked by stimulating the retina with rays of wavelength 490-560 nm and situated between blue and yellow. The complementary colour of green is a non-spectral colour situated in the red-purple region.

green

1. a composite color made by mixing blue and yellow; the color of young grass.
2. untrained.
References in periodicals archive ?
In other words, compared with consumers who are highly innovative or highly publicly self-conscious, those who exhibit high levels of both innovation and public self-consciousness are more likely to buy green products because in doing so, they can fulfill their innate need to be innovative and project themselves as an innovator to others.
Many of them show that green consumers bear high costs in buying green products (Straughan and Roberts, 1999; Laroche et al.
Regionally, familiarity of green products was found to be highest in South (83 percent) and East (68 percent), followed by West (42 percent) and North (53 percent).
Since all the stated factors are completely different in the two worlds, developed and developing; thus, many of green products are thought to be costly by the consumers.
The results of the current study converge with prior research on alternative green consumption experiences, the "green" attribute as the performance criterion, green products as moral artefacts, and the benefits of the green products.
The survey found that 78 per cent of respondents sought personal benefits in green products, with green food/drinks the top choice for 95 per cent, followed by energy-saving electronics/electric appliances (90 per cent), clothing (57 per cent) and personal care (53 per cent).
The green brands survey shows that packaging and publicity both figure high on the consumer mind as important parameters for choosing green products.
Fujitsu continues to provide environmental information about products that meet green demands in each market, while at the same time offering green products that fit respective market needs.
From a marketing perspective, a green revolution and the adoption of green products can be facilitated if we understand the consumer behavior underlying the decision to purchase green products.
The 2011 Green Products Expo will be held April 13 at the Grand Hyatt Hotel at Grand Central Station in NewYork City.
Thailand is at present the leader of green products among countries in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), whereas the European Union, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan and China are those already having their green products developed.