ligature

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ligature

 [lig´ah-chur]
any material, such as a thread or wire, used in surgery to tie off blood vessels to prevent bleeding, or to treat abnormalities in other parts of the body by constricting the tissues; see also strangulation. Ligatures are used both inside and outside the body. If one must be left within the body after an operation, the type used will usually be of animal tissue or synthetic material that will dissolve or become incorporated in the patient's own body tissue. Those used on the outside of the body for stitches of cuts or incisions can be of any durable material and are removed after they have served their purpose. Special instruments have been developed for the application of ligatures to parts of the body that are difficult for the surgeon's hands to reach or to work in.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

lig·a·ture

(lig'ă-chūr),
1. A thread, wire, fillet, or the like, tied tightly around a blood vessel, the pedicle of a tumor, or other structure to constrict it.
2. In orthodontics, a wire or other material used to secure an orthodontic attachment or tooth to an archwire.
[L. ligatura, a band or tie, fr. ligo, to tie]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ligature

(lĭg′ə-cho͝or′, -chər)
n.
1. The act of tying or binding.
2.
a. A cord, wire, or bandage used for tying or binding.
b. A thread, wire, or cord used in surgery to close vessels or tie off ducts.
c. Something that unites; a bond.
3. A character, letter, or unit of type, such as æ, combining two or more letters.
4. Music
a. A group of notes intended to be played or sung as one phrase.
b. A curved line indicating such a phrase; a slur.
c. A passage of notes sung by repeating the same syllable.
d. A metal band that attaches the reed to the mouthpiece of the clarinet and related instruments.
tr.v. liga·tured, liga·turing, liga·tures
To ligate.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ligature

Surgery
1. A material–silk, gut, wire, etc used to ligate.
2. A tissue plus the ligating material.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

lig·a·ture

(lig'ă-chŭr)
1. A thread, wire, fillet, or the like, tied tightly around a blood vessel, the pedicle of a tumor, or other structure to constrict it.
2. orthodontics A wire or other material used to secure an orthodontic attachment or tooth to an archwire.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

ligature

Any thread-like surgical material tied tightly round any structure. Ligatures are commonly made of absorbable material, such as catgut or collagen, but may be non-absorbable.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

lig·a·ture

(lig'ă-chŭr)
1. In orthodontics, a wire or other material used to secure an orthodontic attachment or tooth to an archwire.
2. A thread, wire, fillet, or the like, tied tightly around a blood vessel or other structure to constrict it.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012