grand theory


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

grand theory

A set of abstract ideas that together make a broad statement about human beings, the environment, health, or nursing. A grand theory is broad in scope. It is made up of concepts and propositions that are less abstract and general than the concepts and propositions of a conceptual model but are not as concrete and specific as the concepts and propositions of a middle-range theory. A grand theory sometimes is used in place of a conceptual model as a guide for research or practice.
See also: theory
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The key here is to embrace theoretical contextualization; otherwise, the study falls short of developing MRT and simply becomes an application of a grand theory. (Note: we are not suggesting that theoretical application is not valuable; it often is, but it is not MRT.) In the top-down strategy, abduction starts with deduction, followed by induction, and then back and forth between the two.
Furthermore, the "grand theory" of the cinematic apparatus and its feminist revisions have been strongly criticized in the cognitive film studies represented by David Bordwell and Noel Carroll's anthology Post-Theory: Reconstructing Film Studies.
One common misuse for theory in quantitative agricultural education research is the inaccurate use of grand theory. As Camp (2001) articulated, grand theories are more common in natural sciences than social sciences.
Yet Kaplan's paean to a Grand Theory of Everything utterly fails to explain how the lobby book and the blurb fit into that Grand Theory, which make it seem something less than grand.
The article in Inspfre called Ahmadi-nejad's grand theory "ridiculous" and said it "stands in face of all logic and evidence."
Before analyzing how suicide bombing negates postmodernism--which, to many observers, sounds disconnected--one must understand grand theory, postmodernism, and suicide terrorism, as well as their connections to each other.
The study of cinema has lodged itself firmly in the academy and turned slowly away from an adolescent enthusiasm for grand theory towards a recognition of the need to rewrite the history of the cinema...unencumbered by theories of ideology and spectatorship, and rooted instead in the detailed observation of the material of cinema itself; its recording and projecting equipment as much as the films themselves and contemporary accounts of their exhibition.
It's impressive and illuminating, but little about the book is more impressive than the number of times Hawking says we just don't have the answers yet: We still lack a grand theory uniting all the physical forces.
Avoiding the gravitational field of a grand theory has its advantages.
While these do not, he argues further, 'add up to the grand theory to which he aspired' they still have 'lasting value', a value still largely unappreciated today.