gram-negative meningitis

gram-negative meningitis

Infectious disease An acute meningitis caused by coliform bacteria–eg E coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, P aeruginosa, Proteus morgagni, K pneumoniae; GNM starts elsewhere the body and spreads to the brain or spinal cord via the bloodstream Risk factors Recent neurosurgery, open head trauma, CSF shunts, UTIs in children Clinical Fever, severe headache, N&V, stiff neck, photophobia, change in mental status Lab Bacteria, PMNs in CSF Management Antibiotics Complications Endotoxic shock, brain abscess. See Meningitis.
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maltophilia meningitis in neonates, we extrapolated our management plan from that of other Gram-negative meningitis. Therefore, CSF was repeated at 2 days of antibiotics to confirm sterility.
We believe it should be similar to the duration used when treating other Gram-negative meningitis (i.e., at least three weeks).
In a recent retrospective series of spontaneous Gram-negative meningitis, E.
While thirdgeneration cephalosporins remain the empiric treatment of choice for Gram-negative meningitis, the emergence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases- (ESBL-) producing E.
Intraventricular or intrathecal use of polymyxins in patients with Gram-negative meningitis: a systematic review of the available evidence.
To assess the ability of CSF CRP to differentiate gram-positive from gram-negative meningitis, we compared CRP concentrations in the blood and CSF, along with CSF nitric oxide (NO), protein, glucose, and leukocyte count, in 17 consecutive patients (age range, 2 months to 47 years) with suspected bacterial meningitis and in noninfected controls.
The ratio of CRP in CSF to CRP in blood was 3.28% [+ or -] 1.11% in gram-positive bacterial meningitis vs 9.44% [+ or -] 4.08% in gram-negative meningitis (P [+ or -] 0.072; Mann-Whitney U-test).

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