graft

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Related to grafts: skin grafting, vascular grafts

graft

 [graft]
1. any tissue or organ for implantation or transplantation.
2. to implant or transplant such tissues. This term is preferred over transplant in the case of skin grafts. See also implant.
allogeneic graft allograft.
autodermic graft (autoepidermic graft) a skin graft taken from the patient's own body.
autologous graft (autoplastic graft) a graft taken from another area of the patient's own body; called also autograft.
avascular graft a graft of tissue in which not even transient vascularization is achieved.
bone graft bone transplanted from one site to another.
bypass graft an autograft consisting of a segment of vein or artery grafted into place in a bypass.
cable graft a nerve graft made up of several sections of nerve in the manner of a cable.
coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) see under bypass.
cutis graft dermal graft.
delayed graft a skin graft that is sutured back into its bed and subsequently used after several days.
dermal graft (dermic graft) a skin graft of dermis, used instead of fascia in various plastic procedures.
epidermic graft a skin graft in which a piece of epidermis is implanted on a raw surface.
fascia graft a graft of fibrous tissue, usually taken from the external investing fascia of the lower limb (fascia lata).
fascicular graft a nerve graft in which bundles of nerve fibers are approximated and sutured separately.
filler graft one used for the filling of defects, as the filling of depressions with fatty tissue or of a bony cyst cavity with bone chips or dried cartilage.
free graft a graft of tissue completely freed from its bed, in contrast to a flap.
full-thickness graft a skin graft consisting of the full thickness of the skin, with little or none of the subcutaneous tissue.
heterodermic graft a skin graft taken from a donor of another species.
heterologous graft (heteroplastic graft) xenograft.
homologous graft a graft of tissue obtained from the body of another animal of the same species but with a genotype differing from that of the recipient; called also allograft and homograft.
inlay graft a skin graft or mucosal graft applied by spreading the graft over a stent and suturing the graft and mold into a prepared pocket.
isogeneic graft (isologous graft) (isoplastic graft) syngraft.
lamellar graft replacement of the superficial layers of an opaque cornea by a thin layer of clear cornea from a donor eye.
mesh graft a type of split-thickness graft in which many tiny splits have been made in the skin to allow it to be stretched to cover a larger area.
Ollier-Thiersch graft a very thin skin graft in which long, broad strips of skin, consisting of the epidermis, rete, and part of the corium, are used.
omental graft a segment of omentum and its supplying vasculature, transplanted as a free flap to another area and revascularized by anastomosis of arteries and veins.
pedicle graft pedicle flap.
penetrating graft a full-thickness corneal transplant.
periosteal graft a piece of periosteum to cover a denuded bone.
Phemister graft a bone graft of cortical bone with cancellous bone chips to enhance callus formation.
pinch graft a small piece of skin graft, partial or full thickness, obtained by elevating the skin with a needle and slicing it off with a knife.
porcine graft a split-thickness graft of skin from a pig, applied to a denuded area on a human as a temporary dressing for treatment of a severe burn.
sieve graft a skin graft from which tiny circular islands of skin are removed so that a larger denuded area can be covered, the sievelike portion being placed over one area, and the individual islands over surrounding or other denuded areas.
skin graft a piece of skin transplanted to replace a lost portion of skin; see also skin grafting.
split-skin graft (split-thickness graft) a skin graft consisting of the epidermis and a portion of dermis.
Diagram of a cross-section of the skin, demonstrating split thickness and full thickness skin grafts. From Roberts and Hedges, 1991.
syngeneic graft syngraft.
thick-split graft a skin graft consisting of the epidermis and about two thirds of the dermis.
Thiersch graft Ollier-Thiersch graft.

graft

(graft), Do not confuse this word with graph.
1. Any tissue or organ for transplantation.
See also: flap, implant, transplant.
2. To transplant such structures.
See also: flap, implant, transplant.
[A.S. graef]

graft

(grăft)
v. grafted, grafting, grafts
v.tr.
To transplant or implant (living tissue, for example) surgically into a bodily part to replace a damaged part or compensate for a defect.
v.intr.
1. To make a graft.
2. To be or become joined.
n.
a. Material, especially living tissue or an organ, surgically attached to or inserted into a bodily part to replace a damaged part or compensate for a defect.
b. The procedure of implanting or transplanting such material.
c. The configuration or condition resulting from such a procedure.

graft′er n.

graft

Immunology Any tissue taken from one part of the body of the same or different person and used to replace diseased or injured tissue in another part of the body. See Allograft, Bone graft, Bypass graft, Corneal graft, Coronary artery bypass graft, Dermagraft, Endovascular stent graft, Endoscopic coronary artery bypass graft, Fetal brain graft, Hair graft, Hemi-homograft, Hemobahn endovascular graft, Irradiated chondral graft, Isograft, Micrograft, Minigraft, Skin graft, Split thickness graft, Standard hair graft, Strip graft, Test graft, Tissue graft, White graft.

graft

(graft)
1. Any free (unattached) tissue or organ for transplantation.
2. To transplant such structures.
See also: flap, implant, transplant
[A.S. graef]

graft

A tissue or organ, taken from another part of the body or from another donor person, and surgically implanted to make up a deficit or to replace a defective part. To be successfully retained, a graft must quickly establish an adequate blood supply and must be able to resist immunological rejection responses.

graft

the transfer of a small part of an organism to a relatively larger part where it is transplanted. This may take place from one part of an organism to another part (see AUTOGRAFT), or from one organism to another (see ISOGRAFT, HOMOGRAFT, HETEROGRAFT). Many embryological studies have involved grafting, and from a medical point of view, skin grafting, particularly after serious burns, is commonplace. Organ grafts such as heart transplants are now much more common, though rejection by an animal of the tissues of another is still a serious problem (see IMMUNE RESPONSE). In animals the graft comes from a ‘donor’ and is transferred to the recipient. In plants, grafts are used often in horticulture, where a scion, the plant to be cultivated, is attached onto a STOCK (1), the rooting portion.

Graft

To implant living tissue surgically. In coronary artery bypass graft surgery, healthy veins or arteries are grafted to coronary arteries.

graft

(graft)
1. Any free (unattached) tissue or organ for transplantation.
2. To transplant such structures.
See also: flap, implant, transplant
[A.S. graef ]
References in periodicals archive ?
Then few pieces of gelfoam were put in middle ear to create bed for perichondrial graft. After placing the graft over the bed, the graft was easily spread medial to the remnants of TM such that no space was left between TM and canal wall.
Arterial grafts protect the native coronary vessels from atherosclerotic disease progression.
Possible explanations include the high rate of patients who were randomised to receive a bilateral internal thoracic artery but actually received a single internal thoracic artery and in those assigned a single internal thoracic artery graft about one fifth actually received an additional arterial graft in the form of a radial artery.
Thirty days old seedlings (scions) and grafted seedlings (15 days after grafting) of two cultivars (Palee F1 and CO 1) were transplanted at 2 x 1 square meter apart under pandal system.
Although 64 slice MSCT has become gold standard for evaluation of post CABG grafts, still development of new generation scanners are still under way.
CT angiogram was obtained (Figures 1 and 2), which demonstrated coarctation of the aorta and bypass graft between the left subclavian artery and the descending thoracic aorta.
Graft compatibility is defined as a sufficiently close genetic (taxonomic) relation ship between the cultivar and rootstock to allow the formation of a successful graft union, assuming that all other factors (such as technique, temperature) are satisfactory.
"Skin grafts are not a failure of reconstruction," Dr.
Impra[R] vascular grafts are synthetic grafts constructed of ePTFE material, indicated for the use as a vascular access prosthesis (see Figure 4).
Given the simple conditions needed for a successful graft and the amount of time that grafting has been practiced (going as far back as 1000 B.C.
Species selection is pivotal in plant grafting because grafting failure is often the result of incompatibility between the rootstock and the scion, characterized by absence of normal tissue development at the graft, with the occurrence of vascular vessels that are not completely lignified.
The Hemodynamic Stability of the Vein Graft. All rabbits survived, and all of the vein grafts were unobstructed 4 weeks later.