graft survival


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Related to graft survival: graft survival rate

graft survival

Persistent functioning of a transplanted organ or tissue in a recipient of that organ. Survival rates of transplanted organs are influenced by many factors, including the age and health status of both the donor and the recipient of the graft, the immunological match between the donor and the recipient, the preparation of the organ before transplantation, and the use of immunosuppressive drugs. For some organ transplantation, graft survival approximates 90%.
See also: survival
References in periodicals archive ?
Transplant programs in the United States are evaluated on the basis of one- and three-year patient and graft survival outcomes that are publicly reported every six months by the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR).
Caption: Figure 4: Steatosis hepatis prelavence and influence on graft survival. (a) Increased rates of EAD in steatotic liver grafts (p = 0.013).
In addition, one-way multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) to test the hypotheses that there would be one or more mean difference between the factors (HLA antibody, MICA antibody and HLA mismatch) and graft survival was performed to check for the effect of potential confounders.
Concerning failed PKP grafts, the treatment effect of DSAEK has also been investigated in recent studies, including graft survival, visual recovery, and the occurrence of related complications.
Graft survival at one, three, and five years post-transplant were 86.0%, 79.0% and 65.0%, respectively [Figure 2].
In the largest orthotopic renal transplant series to date (223 transplants over a 31-year period) excellent 1-, 10- and 20-year overall patient (92%, 78% and 63%) and graft (88%, 59% and 35%) survival were reported, with no difference in 20-year patient or graft survival compared with heterotopic transplants.
Yoo et al and Urbaniak et al21 also found better graft survival in patients aged 35 years and younger.
(2005), host/graft interactions with higher botanical affinity will lead to better chances of graft survival. As such, grafting combinations involving species from the same family (apple, plum, peach, and pear trees) and from different genera (citrus) have been successfully performed for fruit production.
The association of higher pretransplant sCD30 [9, 10, 15, 16, 25, 28, 29] and posttransplant sCD30 [27, 28, 30-32] with increased risk of graft loss and worse graft survival was found in most published studies, including several large multicenter studies [9, 10, 32].
Smoking and its effects in kidney transplantation Donor (i) More perioperative complications (ii) More postoperative wound infection (iii) Less likely to provide follow-up informations (iv) High creatinine at the end of 1 year (v) Higher death rate in donor with history of smoking Recipient (i) High risk of cardiovascular disease (ii) Reduced graft survival (iii) Reduced kidney transplant recipient survival (iv) ?
PCAR is associated with a poor treatment response, resulting in poorer graft survival than seen with other types of acute rejection [1,2,4].