graduated


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graduated

 [graj´u-āt″ed]
marked by a succession of lines, steps, or degrees.

grad·u·at·ed

(grad'yū-āt'ed),
1. Marked with a scale to allow measurement.
2. Segmented or otherwise marked off in levels, grades, or successive steps.

grad·u·at·ed

(graj'ū-āt'ĕd)
1. Marked by lines or in other ways to denote capacity, degrees, percentages, or other discrete measurements.
2. Divided or arranged in levels, grades, or successive steps.
References in periodicals archive ?
Students in Utah that graduated with debt graduated with an average of $18,425 of debt.
Kevin Andrew Bjorklund, of West Boylston, graduated from Worcester State College with a bachelor of science degree.
These days, the transitive graduate ("she was graduated") is considered old-fashioned, while the intransitive ("I graduated!") is well-established and far more common.
While fewer students graduated from Ohio schools in 2000, those that did showed themselves more willing to relocate after graduation than their older cohort.
Paul King, chairman of UBM, the largest African American-owned construction company in Illinois, graduated from the program and lauds its accomplishments.
"I have friends who graduated in May, and they can't find anything in their fields," Chavez says.
In 1995, about the same proportion (87%) of White and Black students graduated from high school (Jaffe, 1998; USDOC, 1996).
The number of written exam (EPPP) passes and failures as a function of type of program graduated from was obtained from the California Board of Psychology for April 1996, April 1997, and October, 1997.
Newly graduated college students experienced the hardest time getting a job this year in more than four decades, the Education Ministry said Thursday in a survey that reflects the severity of the Japanese economy.
He graduated last year with a BSc (Hons) in Product Design from the University of Central Lancashire but experienced difficulty in securing work within his chosen career.
The fatal flaw in Exner-Seeman's work, which his own data reveal, is that, given the much larger numbers of Gymnasium than of Realgymnasium or Oberrealschule graduates, a significantly higher number of upper-class sons graduated from the classical than from the semiclassical or modern schools.

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