graduate


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graduate

 [graj´oo-at]
1. person who has received a degree from a university or college.
2. a measuring vessel marked by a series of lines.

grad·u·ate

(grad'yū-ăt),
A vessel, usually of glass and suitably marked, used for measuring the volume of liquids; graduate cylinder.
[Mediev. L. graduatus, fr. L. gradus, step]

graduate

An obsolete term that dignified laboratory glassware with marks for measuring volume; it is still used in adjectival form, as in a graduated cylinder.
References in periodicals archive ?
M2 PRESSWIRE-August 15, 2019-: 380,000 new graduates heading for a lifetime of underemployment
Recent graduates from arts-based degrees were the most likely to be employed in roles where they were overeducated in 2017 (51.0 per cent).
The survey is a useful tool to support MoHE in gaining statistical information of graduates, their majors, universities and employability rate.
According to a report from graduate career experts Prospects, nearly 16 per cent of all graduates chose to go into further study in 2017 - up from 13 per cent the previous year.
5,211 out of a total of 6,466 full-time fresh NUS graduates from the Class of 2017 and 595 out of 825 follow-up NUS graduates3 participated in the joint survey.
The study shows the percentage of recent graduates working in these roles has risen from 41 per cent in September 2002 to 49 per cent in September 2017.
Comparing the results of the survey for the graduates of private and government educational institutions, the results showed that graduates of government educational institutions are more employed than the graduates of private educational institutions.
While Cambridge, Oxford and LSE graduates are identified as the top average earners, the survey also notes the "very strong performance of some Northern universities, Liverpool, Newcastle and York, which have graduates that achieve highly competitive earnings even though their local labour markets have lower earnings than we see in the Southern part of England."
With the increasing focus on providing teaching opportunities and training to graduate students, the need to examine the influence of such changes has also increased.
This year has been dubbed "(http://www.ibtimes.com/chinese-college-graduates-cannot-secure-jobs-28-beijings-2013-graduates-44-shanghais-have-found-job) the worst year to graduate college in history ." By mid-April, only 28 percent of Beijing's 2013 graduates had found jobs.
This report describes the findings of a nationally representative sample of 544 recent high school graduates from the classes of 2006 through 2011.

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