gradualism

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gradualism

(grăj′o͞o-ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. The belief in or the policy of advancing toward a goal by gradual, often slow stages.
2. Biology The view that evolution proceeds by imperceptibly small, cumulative steps over long periods of time rather than by abrupt, major changes.

grad′u·al·ist n.
grad′u·al·is′tic adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the same letters, he warned his counterpart to adopt a gradualist approach to implementing Islamic law.
One can see that the gradualists as opposed to what Baregu calls the "rapidist" managed to place breaks on the idea of continental unity.
Having defined the gradualist approach as requiring certain institutional changes before the liberalisation--which no country performed--Havrylyshyn condemns going slowly as 'one of the biggest and most scandalous canards ...
Both the "independentists" and the "gradualists" agree however, that the means of moving towards the ultimate goal should not include violence; almost all Kurdish groups in Iran reject the idea of armed struggle.
It will not make pleasant reading for beleaguered SNP leader John Swinney, as he presides over the Nats' own battle between the fundamentalists - who want independence or nothing - and gradualist wing of the party, who are prepared to win that battle over a longer timescale.
It examines the role of Chilean businessmen and landowners, especially the large conglomerates, before the 1973 coup and in three distinct periods of policymaking, gradualist (1973-75), radical (1975-82), and pragmatic (1983-88) neoliberalism.
Perkins replaces the outmoded portrait of debtor and creditor interests with a more accurate description of a clash between "gradualist" and "urgency" factions.
The distribution of civilians in top economic policy-making ministries and advisory positions clearly reflected the dominance of gradualists within the policy coalition.
Although the gradualists dominated the afternoon's discussion, their counterparts in the extinction debate were present at the conference.
He is the father of the 'radicals' while Nyerere who argued for first, the building of regional unions and then improvement on these to create the United States of Africa, represent the doyen of the gradualists.
It is not so much about Poland, however, but rather about the decade long experience of postsocialist transformation and about the debates between shock therapist and gradualists that dominated academic and political discussions during this recent decade.
On the one hand there are the Swinney gradualists who, while still claiming to want independence, say they will put the final decision to a referendum if they win a Scottish Parliament election.