grade IV astrocytoma

grade IV as·tro·cy·to·ma

astrocytoma of high grade; World Health Organization designation.
See also: glioblastoma multiforme.

gli·o·blas·to·ma mul·ti·for·me

(glī'ō-blas-tō'mă mŭl'ti-fōr'mē)
A glioma consisting chiefly of undifferentiated anaplastic cells of glial origin that show marked nuclear pleomorphism, necrosis, and vascular endothelial proliferation; frequently, tumor cells are arranged radially about an irregular focus of necrosis; these neoplasms grow rapidly, invade extensively, and occur most frequently in the cerebrum of adults.
Synonym(s): grade IV astrocytoma.
[G. glia, glue, + blastos, germ, + -oma, tumor]
References in periodicals archive ?
Glioblastoma multiforme, also known as grade IV astrocytoma, is a malignant grade IV brain tumor that rapidly spreads within the brain cells and can also infect the nearby cells.
It is often referred to as a grade IV astrocytoma and is the most common type of brain cancer.
Her diagnosis of glioblastoma multiforme, often referred to as grade IV astrocytoma, is one of less than 200 documented cases in the past 40 years in which the tumor is in her spine rather than the brain.
The fusion database for brain images is classified into normal, grade II astrocytoma, and grade IV astrocytoma images.
The original MRI images belonging to normal brain, grade II astrocytoma, and grade IV astrocytoma are shown in Figures 1(a)-1(c), respectively.
Grade IV astrocytoma, GBM, is the most common type of glioma and has a survival time varying from less than 1 year to 3 years after initial diagnosis.
Grade IV astrocytoma is called glioblastoma, which has the highest degree of malignancy and also has an extremely poor prognosis.
Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, (5) grade IV astrocytoma) is the most common and most aggressive brain tumor in adults (1).
No control subject had a 2.740-kDa peak size <22, whereas 15% of grade II, 40% of grade III, and 48% of grade IV astrocytoma patients did (Fig.
(10) Microvascular proliferation (MVP), loosely defined to include endothelial hypertrophy, endothelial hyperplasia, and glomeruloid vessels, and/or necrosis are distinguishing features of WHO grade IV astrocytoma, the latter being synonymous with the commonly used term glioblastoma multiforme or simply glioblastoma (GBM) in the current WHO scheme.
Her diagnosis of GBM, often referred to as grade IV astrocytoma, is one of less than 200 documented cases in the past 40 years in which the tumor is in Megan's spine rather than the brain.
Grade IV astrocytomas are highly invasive and are almost always fatal.