governance


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Related to governance: Corporate governance

governance

A term widely used at all levels of UK bureaucracy for the manner in which a thing or process is governed; oversight.

gov·ern·ance

(gŭv'ĕr-năns)
The act or power of exercising authority or control.
[L. , to govern, fr. g. kubernō, to steer a ship]
References in periodicals archive ?
It is now paramount that all institutional owners revisit the adequacy of their corporate governance assessments when evaluating a stock for long-term accumulation.
Both Canada and Singapore consulted in early 2003 on whether corporate governance rules should be reflected in the legislative framework of financial institutions.
Do some CEOs need a kick in the pants when it comes to sending their directors to corporate governance conferences?
In their book, Watching the Watchers: Corporate Governance for the 21st Century (Blackwell Publishing, 1996), Robert Monks and Nell Minow outline key issues in corporate governance and its evolution in the United States.
The IT Governance Implementation Guide provides direction for implementing or improving IT governance using Control Objectives for Information and related Technology (CobiT).
1 There is no good governance without democracy, participatory process and accountability.
To that end, the study focused on three fundamental principles of corporate governance (openness, integrity and accountability) cited in a document, known as the Cadbury report, produced in 1992 by the United Kingdom's committee on the financial aspects of corporate governance.
The answer, according to experts in corporate governance, is a resounding "Yes
But major changes are occurring in risk assurance, corporate governance and internal audit practices, as well -- changes with significant import for audit committee members and senior management alike.

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