gore

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gore

noun A nonspecific term for blood, guts or any such graphic viscera, often in the context of a fictional horror movie.

verb To pierce or stab with a horn or tusk—e.g., to be gored in a bull fight.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2007, the National Center for Public Policy Research (NCPPR) released a study showing that Al Gore's gargantuan "carbon footprint" destroys his status as a credible champion for changing wasteful ways.
* The past year, Gore's home energy use averaged 19,241 kilowatt hours (kWh) every month, compared to the U.S.
* Gore guzzles more electricity in one year than the average American family uses in 21 years.
Later in the morning I came across a moderately disheveled guy yelling at a person nearby about how we can't have globalization with an 18th-century history education (the ranter was a Gore supporter, obviously).
Al Sharpton made the trek down from the Big Apple, carrying a banner that said, "This is more about Selma than Gore or Bush." I suspect Sharpton might have passed away and it's just his preserved corpse carrying on the struggle.
"Al Gore is using lawyers to generate new votes and I think that is a dangerous step," said Doug Graham, who took the morning off from his government job to dress up in a gray ballot box made from Styrofoam and duct tape.
The implications of that certitude are complicated, and in that apparent confidence lie the origins not just of Gore's ambition ("We raised him for it," his father said when Gore was nominated for vice president) but of his uneven public style (the tendency to lecture, the occasional stiffness).
But you can also see the beginnings of the cautious, sometimes overly formal Gore in those early days.
(His boisterous Oyster Bay cousins tardy referred to Franklin as "Miss Nancy.") Maraniss and Nakashima paint a similar portrait of the young Gore. On a field trip to Andrews Air Force Base when Al was 10, the St.
Gore was always expected to get a post-convention "bounce," but such bounces always faded.
Gore had defused Bush's best issue--the morality-honor-dignity package--by choosing the publicly pious Sen.
The fact is that Gore's remarkable early success was seemingly built on an unfathomable foundation.