good death


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Related to good death: euthanasia

good death

Medspeak
A term that reflects individual preferences for how a person wants to die. For many people, factors that constitute a good death include dying at home, with family and friends and without stressful physical symptoms (nausea and vomiting, pain, dyspnoea, respiratory tract secretions, pain, and agitation).
 
Vox populi
A death with honour.

good death

Vox populi Any death that others view as a comforting and 'smooth' transition from a living to nonliving state. See End of life decisions.

good death

(gud deth)
Colloquial usage for treatment of a patient in accord with the patient's stated (usually written) wishes and in maintenance of appropriate palliation of pain.

good death

Death in which the rights of the person have been respected and during which the dying person was made as comfortable as possible and was in the company of persons he knew and loved.
See: living will
See also: death
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References in periodicals archive ?
Any resident who wants to be considered for the A Good Death pilot should call Jeannie Penman on 07739 303201.
Each of these personal stories is a precious memory and illustration of a good death. Deaths like this can and should be the norm.
Taking measures to ensure a good death is an obligation for doctors and nursing staff.
Valente (2007) also found that physicians might be an obstacle to affording a good death due to their own beliefs in preservation of hope and life, and an inadequate educational preparation to deal with EOL issues.
"The recent debate over the Joffe assisted dying bill, as well as TV programmes like Esther Rantzen's How To Have A Good Death, have brought the subject to the forefront of people's minds.
As you've probably guessed, we nursed him for a couple of weeks and eventually he got back to his big healthy sell It was my first experience with the veterinary ethic--relieving suffering through "euthanasia," or as it roughly translates, "good death."
Hospice care is still controversial at many major medical centers today, for its goal is not to provide good treatment for the dying but to provide a good death. At their best, hospices excel at delivering what they promise: control over pain, dignity to the end, and the assurance that no one need spend their last moments alone.
The overarching argument is that both early modern women and the chroniclers of their deaths care, beyond anything else, about achieving a 'lasting image' of a good death. Women are schooled, mostly by printed manuals, about what it takes to die well and feel compelled to follow the model.
Good Death, said a Woman, for once be so kind To take me, and leave my dear Husband behind; But when Death appear'd with a sour Grimace, The Woman was dash'd at his thin hatchet Face; So she made him a Court'sy, and modestly sed, If you come for my Husband, he lies there in Bed.
Part 1, "Death in Early Modern England," begins with a chapter on "Facing Death" which reviews material from a variety of sources, including sermons, poems, treatises, diaries, and letters to show the ubiquity of concern for facing death early and making a good death at the end.
FUTURIST researcher Lane Jennings offers new ideas about dying the good death. See "Finding Better Ways to Die," page 43.