gonadotropin


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gonadotropin

 [go´nah-do-tro″pin]
any hormone having a stimulating effect on the gonads. Two such hormones are secreted by the anterior pituitary gland: follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone, both of which are active, but with differing effects, in the two sexes. Called also gonadotropic hormone.
chorionic gonadotropin (human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) (hCG))
1. a glycopeptide hormone that is produced by cells of the fetal placenta and maintains the function of the corpus luteum during the first few weeks of pregnancy. It is thought to promote steroidogenesis in the fetoplacental unit and to stimulate fetal testicular secretion of testosterone. It can be detected by immunoassay in the maternal urine within days after fertilization; this provides the basis for the most commonly used pregnancy test.
2. the same principle obtained from the urine of pregnant women, used in treatment of certain cases of cryptorchidism and male hypogonadism, to induce ovulation and pregnancy in certain infertile, anovulatory women, and to increase the numbers of oocytes for patients attempting conception using assisted reproductive technologies such as gamete intrafallopian transfer or in vitro fertilization; administered intramuscularly. See also choriogonadotropin alfa.

go·nad·o·tro·pin

(gō'nad-ō-trō'pin, gon'ă-dō-),
1. A hormone capable of promoting gonadal growth and function; such effects, as exerted by a single hormone, are usually limited to discrete functions or histologic components of a gonad, such as stimulation of follicular growth or of androgen formation; most gonadotropins exert their effects in both genders, although the effect of a given gonadotropin will differ in males and females.
2. Any hormone that stimulates gonadal function.
3. Any substance that has the combined effects of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone.

gonadotropin

(gō-năd′ə-trō′pĭn, -trŏp′ĭn) also

gonadotrophin

(-trō′fĭn, -trō′pĭn)
n.
A hormone that stimulates the growth and activity of the gonads, especially any of several pituitary hormones that stimulate the function of the ovaries and testes.

gonadotropin

Any of a family of protein hormones secreted by the pituitary, including follitropin (FSH), lutropin (LH) and (human) chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), which in concert regulate normal growth, sexual development and reproduction.

gonadotropin

Gonadotrophin Endocrinology A hormone that regulates ♂ and ♀ reproduction Examples LH and FSH, produced by the anterior pituitary, stimulate the ovaries or testicles to secrete progesterone, testosterone, estrogen; chorionic gonadotropin is produced by the placenta and drives secretion of progesterone and estrogen, which are critical for maintaining the placenta during gestation. See FSH, hCG, LH.

go·nad·o·tro·pin

(gō-nad'ō-trō'pin)
1. A hormone capable of promoting gonadal growth and function; such effects, as exerted by a single hormone, usually are limited to discrete functions or histologic components of a gonad, such as stimulation of follicular growth or of androgen formation; most gonadotropins exert their effects in both sexes, although the effect of a given gonadotropin will differ in males and females.
Synonym(s): gonadotrophin.
2. Any hormone that stimulates gonadal function.
3. Any substance that has the combined effects of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone.

go·nad·o·tro·pin

, gonadotropic hormone (gō-nad'ō-trō'pin, -pik hōr'mōn)
1. A hormone capable of promoting gonadal growth and function.
2. Any hormone that stimulates gonadal function.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pituitary gonadotropin secretion is not only regulated by GnRH secreted by the hypothalamus, but is also associated with the signal transduction of the GnRH receptor.
Reduction of baseline body mass index under gonadotropin suppressive therapy in girls with idiopathic precocious puberty.
An unexpected reason for elevated human chorionic gonadotropin in a young woman.
Flow cytometry method for the analysis of membrane-associated human chorionic gonadotropin, its subunits, and fragments on human cancer cells.
The predictive value of an initial serum beta human chorionic gonadotropin level for pregnancy outcome following in vitro fertilization.
Effectiveness of Cetrorelix for the prevention of premature luteinising hormone surge during controlled ovarian stimulation using letrozole and gonadotropins: a randomized trial.
IUI and ovarian stimulation with gonadotropins is offered to patients with PCOS who are resistant to or have failed to achieve pregnancy with clomiphene citrate (CC), and cumulative live birth rates up to 71% are reported to be achieved in patients with PCOS.13 Since one of the primary modes of action of IUI and gonadotropin stimulation is to induce ovulation, it is logical to expect a higher likelihood of pregnancy in patients with ovulatory problems relative to those with other causes of infertility.
Although higher doses of agonists for the final oocyte maturation have a potential to result in higher gonadotropin surge amplitude and improve the oocyte quantity, the mean number of retrieved oocytes varies and no clear benefit has been demonstrated by this approach (18).
In all the 4 groups, the gonadotropin administration was continued up to the day of human chorionic gonadotropin injection (hCG) (Gonasi[R] HP, IBSA Italia, Rome, Italy).
Many studies have reported an elevated serum progesterone (P) levels above a threshold level of >1.5 ng/mL on the day of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) administration [11, 12].
Also, in Discussion, the text reading "This might be explained by the recent concept of ovarian sensitivity index (OSI: dose of gonadotropins per obtained oocyte), which has been related to pregnancy rate: the smaller the amount of gonadotropins administered per obtained oocyte, the higher the pregnancy rate [16].

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