gonadotropin


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gonadotropin

 [go´nah-do-tro″pin]
any hormone having a stimulating effect on the gonads. Two such hormones are secreted by the anterior pituitary gland: follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone, both of which are active, but with differing effects, in the two sexes. Called also gonadotropic hormone.
chorionic gonadotropin (human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) (hCG))
1. a glycopeptide hormone that is produced by cells of the fetal placenta and maintains the function of the corpus luteum during the first few weeks of pregnancy. It is thought to promote steroidogenesis in the fetoplacental unit and to stimulate fetal testicular secretion of testosterone. It can be detected by immunoassay in the maternal urine within days after fertilization; this provides the basis for the most commonly used pregnancy test.
2. the same principle obtained from the urine of pregnant women, used in treatment of certain cases of cryptorchidism and male hypogonadism, to induce ovulation and pregnancy in certain infertile, anovulatory women, and to increase the numbers of oocytes for patients attempting conception using assisted reproductive technologies such as gamete intrafallopian transfer or in vitro fertilization; administered intramuscularly. See also choriogonadotropin alfa.

go·nad·o·tro·pin

(gō'nad-ō-trō'pin, gon'ă-dō-),
1. A hormone capable of promoting gonadal growth and function; such effects, as exerted by a single hormone, are usually limited to discrete functions or histologic components of a gonad, such as stimulation of follicular growth or of androgen formation; most gonadotropins exert their effects in both genders, although the effect of a given gonadotropin will differ in males and females.
2. Any hormone that stimulates gonadal function.
3. Any substance that has the combined effects of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone.

gonadotropin

/go·nado·tro·pin/ (-tro´pin) any hormone that stimulates the gonads, especially follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone.
chorionic gonadotropin , human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) (hCG) a glycopeptide hormone produced by the fetal placenta syncytiotrophoblasts that maintains the function of the corpus luteum during the first few weeks of pregnancy; the basis for most commonly used pregnancy tests. It is used pharmaceutically to treat certain cases of cryptorchidism and male infertility, to induce ovulation and pregnancy in certain infertile, anovulatory women, and to stimulate oocyte development and maturation in patients using assisted reproductive technologies. See also choriogonadotropin alfa.
human menopausal gonadotropin  (hMG) menotropins.

gonadotropin

(gō-năd′ə-trō′pĭn, -trŏp′ĭn) also

gonadotrophin

(-trō′fĭn, -trō′pĭn)
n.
A hormone that stimulates the growth and activity of the gonads, especially any of several pituitary hormones that stimulate the function of the ovaries and testes.

gonadotropin

[gō′nədōtrop′in]
Etymology: Gk, gone + trophe, nourishment
a hormonal substance that stimulates the function of the testes and the ovaries. The gonadotropic follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone are produced and secreted by the anterior pituitary gland. In early pregnancy, human chorionic gonadotropin is produced by the placenta (basis for early pregnancy detection). It acts to sustain the function of the corpus luteum of the ovary, forestalling menstruation and thus maintaining pregnancy. Gonadotropins are prescribed to induce ovulation in infertility that is caused by inadequate stimulation of the ovary by endogenous gonadotropic hormones. Excessive stimulation of the ovary may result in vast enlargement of the gland, maturation of many follicles, multiple pregnancy, bleeding into the abdomen, and pain. While named for their effects on the ovaries, follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone are also major gonadotropins in the testes, causing the Leydig cells to secrete testosterone and facilitating spermatogenesis. Also called gonadotrophin. gonadotropic, gonadotrophic, adj.

gonadotropin

Any of a family of protein hormones secreted by the pituitary, including follitropin (FSH), lutropin (LH) and (human) chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), which in concert regulate normal growth, sexual development and reproduction.

gonadotropin

Gonadotrophin Endocrinology A hormone that regulates ♂ and ♀ reproduction Examples LH and FSH, produced by the anterior pituitary, stimulate the ovaries or testicles to secrete progesterone, testosterone, estrogen; chorionic gonadotropin is produced by the placenta and drives secretion of progesterone and estrogen, which are critical for maintaining the placenta during gestation. See FSH, hCG, LH.

go·nad·o·tro·pin

(gō-nad'ō-trō'pin)
1. A hormone capable of promoting gonadal growth and function; such effects, as exerted by a single hormone, usually are limited to discrete functions or histologic components of a gonad, such as stimulation of follicular growth or of androgen formation; most gonadotropins exert their effects in both sexes, although the effect of a given gonadotropin will differ in males and females.
Synonym(s): gonadotrophin.
2. Any hormone that stimulates gonadal function.
3. Any substance that has the combined effects of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone.

gonadotrophin

; gonadotropin hormone secreted by both sexes; promotes gonadal growth and function
  • anterior pituitary gonadotrophin pituitary gonadotrophic hormone of hypophyseal origin

  • chorionic gonadotrophin; CG; human chorionic gonadotrophin; hCG placental hormone, excreted in urine of pregnant women

go·nad·o·tro·pin

, gonadotropic hormone (gō-nad'ō-trō'pin, -pik hōr'mōn)
1. A hormone capable of promoting gonadal growth and function.
2. Any hormone that stimulates gonadal function.

gonadotropin (gōnad´ōtrōp´in),

n (gonadotropic hormone) a gonad-stimulating hormone derived either from the pituitary gland (e.g., follicle-stimulating hormone FSH] and luteinizing hormone [LH], which is also an interstitial cell-stimulating hormone [ICSH]) or from the chorion (e.g., chorionic gonadotropin, which is found in the urine of pregnant women).
gonadotropin, chorionic,

gonadotropin

any hormone having a stimulating effect on the gonads. Two such hormones are secreted by the anterior pituitary: follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone, both of which are active, but with differing effects, in the two sexes.

chorionic gonadotropin
a gonad-stimulating hormone produced by cytotrophoblastic cells of the placenta; used in treatment of underdevelopment of the gonads and to induce ovulation. See also pregnancy tests.
gonadotropin release inhibiting factor
pituitary hormone which inhibits the release of luteinizing hormone or follicle-stimulating hormone.
References in periodicals archive ?
Progesterone, estradiol, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), or gonadotropin releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa) have been evaluated in a variety of clinical studies as a means of luteal phase support to increase implantation and pregnancy rates in IVF (2-5).
Merviel and Dodson showed that BMI does not influence pregnancy rates in IUI cycles, but the dose of gonadotropin required to stimulate the ovaries increases parallel with BMI.
Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonists directly and rapidly inhibit gonadotropin release during COS within several hours without hypo-estrogenic side effects, flare-up or long down-regulation and higher OHSS incidence as compared to GnRH agonists.
The monitoring of ovarian responses to gonadotropin stimulation during the treatment cycle began from day 6, using transvaginal sonography and the measurement of the plasma E2 level every 3 days.
The comparison of cycle parameters and clinical outcomes including total gonadotropin doses used, duration of stimulation, mean number of follicles, mean number of oocytes retrieved, mean number of embryos transferred and FR, CCR and CPR are given in table 2.
Gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist (nafarelin) test to differentiate gonadotropin deficiency from constitutionally delayed puberty in teen-age boys - A clinical research center study.
The investigations performed revealed high gonadotropin levels in addition to multiple cysts in the ovaries on ultrasonography.
Secretory rates of human chorionic gonadotropin by normal trophoblast.
Prof Majedah Komaikh Al-Azemi, a consultant in Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine at the Maternity Hospital in Kuwait pointed out that traditionally, IUI or IVF require a daily injection of gonadotropin, for a period of 10 days, a treatment regimen that is emotionally draining for most women who have gone through the process.
Gonadotropin release by clinically nonfunctioning and gonadotroph pituitary adenomas in vivo and in vitro: relation to sex and effects of thyrotropin-releasing hormone, gonadotropin-releasing hormone, and bromocriptine.
The first patent expands the geographical coverage of SCT's core neurogenesis technology for increasing neural stem cell numbers, or neurogenesis, by using human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG).

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