goitrogenic


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goitrogenic

 [goi-tro-jen´ik]
producing goiter.

goi·tro·gen·ic

(goy'trō-jen'ik),
Causing goiter.

goi·tro·gen·ic

(goy'trō-jen'ik)
Causing goiter.
References in periodicals archive ?
The goitrogenic cruciferous family, preferably raw: kale, cauliflower, broccoli, brussels sprouts.
The major objective of this study was to assess the prevalence and cause of IDD in Burie and Womberma districts by conducting clinical examinations for total goiter rates, urinary iodide level determination, assessment of goitrogenic factors and knowledge, attitude and practices of the communities towards the use of iodated salt.
Human studies in Mexico did not consider Se deficiency as a goitrogenic factor [22, 23].
Cooking may help to inactivate the goitrogenic compounds, but it isn't clear just how many of them are affected or how much.
Many feedstuffs have goitrogenic (goiter-producing) effects that inhibit thyroid activity.
Canola meal that is not properly heat processed may be goitrogenic for poultry.
Some goitrogenic foods are cabbage, rutabagas, soybeans and peaches.
Thyroid nodules are common clinical findings and have a reported prevalence of 4% to 7% in the general population.[1-3] Thyroid nodules are more common in women, and the incidence increases with age, a history of radiation exposure, and a diet containing goitrogenic material.[3] The vast majority of these nodules are nonneoplastic lesions or benign neoplasms.
What about so-called goitrogenic foods, such as cabbage, turnips, Brussels sprouts, kale, mustard greens, cassava, peanuts, pine nuts and millet?
An example of a harmful grain is rapeseed, which may be goitrogenic (Bell and Check 1960).