go private

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go private

To seek healthcare in the private sector—i.e., outside of the NHS. Going private means paying for healthcare services to which a patient is entitled for free under the NHS, but for which he/she may wait for months to receive. Thus, well-off patients forego free services to avoid frustration around scheduling and booking delays due to NHS backlogs for non-emergent care and services.
References in periodicals archive ?
AirMedia Group Inc (Nasdaq:AMCN) reported on Wednesday that it signed a termination agreement with AirMedia Holdings Ltd and AirMedia Merger Company Limited, to stop the merger agreement for a going private transaction.
TELECOMWORLDWIRE-July 7, 2015-Qihoo 360 committee retains financial advisor to consider going private proposal
An upsurge of going private activity first occurred in the 1980s and was characterized by the use of leveraged buy-outs (LBOs).
Icahn, in a letter to shareholders also filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, did not place a value on the offer, but said it "is superior to the going private transaction.
Support features are governed by the service-level agreements in customer contracts, and going private won't have an impact on the company's current contractual responsibilities, said Charles King, principal analyst at Pund-IT.
That's why it's hard to tell, strictly from looking at the share price, what kind of pop will result from going private.
Going private would leave the company, which had $14.
Travel Business Review-November 22, 2011--Magnotta Winery Announces Going Private Transaction(C)2011] ENPublishing - http://www.
The grant of the waiver takeover rule does not imply that the DFSA has approved or disapproved the proposed going private transaction," the company clarified in an e-mailed statement.
We investigate this issue by examining whether SOX affected the propensity of firms to go private, and the effect of SOX on valuation of firms going private.
This paper investigates how the characteristics of a Hong Kong-listed firm influence its odds of going bankrupt, being acquired, and going private.
In June, as part of the two-step process to going private, Tribune bought back about 52% of shares outstanding in a tender offer that was oversubscribed, with shareholders offering 90% of shares outstanding.