grapheme

(redirected from glyph)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

grapheme

(grăf′ēm)
1. A letter of an alphabet.
2. The smallest element in a writing system.
3. A written symbol or group of symbols used to represent a single sound.
References in periodicals archive ?
He collaborated with a series of Mayan scribes, also converts, to capture the Mayan glyphs and map them, one-to-one, to the Latin alphabet.
About the Company: Glyph, established in beautiful historic Havre de Grace, Maryland in the spring of 2012, had its genesis in Creative Director Don Starr's acquisition of two traditional letterpresses and 48+ cases of metal type.
The Glyph technology is designed to harness the biology of the lymphatic system and the endogenous trafficking of compounds through this network to develop novel drugs that bypass first-pass metabolism, improve oral bioavailability, and significantly lower the risk of liver toxicity.
Turning next to the ahuitzotl depictions, and, as Umberger argues that the ahuitzotl glyph did not indicate a supernatural creature, but rather an Aztec ruler, King Ahuitzotl (Fig.
Glyph Training For subjects who were assigned to glyph training, baseline conditional discriminations AB and BC were established with 20 three-member glyph sets, designated 78, 9-10, 11-12, 13-14, 15-16, 17-18, 19-20, 21-22, 23-24, and 25-26.
To accomplish this feat, the Glyph uses a low-power, three-color LED.
The technology that powers the Glyph centers around a set of 2 million microscopic mirrors -- 1 million per eye-that reflect visuals, including 3-D, into the user's eye.
It's a collection of all text characters, known as glyphs. Glyphs include numbers, symbols, and punctuation marks, as well as letters.
Measuring 50ft in diameter and weighing over three tonnes, the Glyph was one of the largest and brightest man-made structures to ever fly over a capital city.
The glyph below shows one of the eight Heh gods who hold up the sky.
To use the book, one simply scans the two pages at the beginning to find the desired concept represented by a glyph. These are organized into broad conceptual categories: people, gods, body parts, regalia, and so on.
The glyph <[??]>, writing the word sui < *swats 'year, etc.', has often been considered a phono-semantic compound incorporating <[??]>, this writing the once similar-sounding word yue < *wat 'battle-axe'.