gonadotropin

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Related to glycoprotein hormone: TSH

gonadotropin

 [go´nah-do-tro″pin]
any hormone having a stimulating effect on the gonads. Two such hormones are secreted by the anterior pituitary gland: follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone, both of which are active, but with differing effects, in the two sexes. Called also gonadotropic hormone.
chorionic gonadotropin (human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) (hCG))
1. a glycopeptide hormone that is produced by cells of the fetal placenta and maintains the function of the corpus luteum during the first few weeks of pregnancy. It is thought to promote steroidogenesis in the fetoplacental unit and to stimulate fetal testicular secretion of testosterone. It can be detected by immunoassay in the maternal urine within days after fertilization; this provides the basis for the most commonly used pregnancy test.
2. the same principle obtained from the urine of pregnant women, used in treatment of certain cases of cryptorchidism and male hypogonadism, to induce ovulation and pregnancy in certain infertile, anovulatory women, and to increase the numbers of oocytes for patients attempting conception using assisted reproductive technologies such as gamete intrafallopian transfer or in vitro fertilization; administered intramuscularly. See also choriogonadotropin alfa.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

go·nad·o·tro·pin

(gō'nad-ō-trō'pin, gon'ă-dō-),
1. A hormone capable of promoting gonadal growth and function; such effects, as exerted by a single hormone, are usually limited to discrete functions or histologic components of a gonad, such as stimulation of follicular growth or of androgen formation; most gonadotropins exert their effects in both genders, although the effect of a given gonadotropin will differ in males and females.
2. Any hormone that stimulates gonadal function.
3. Any substance that has the combined effects of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

gonadotropin

(gō-năd′ə-trō′pĭn, -trŏp′ĭn) also

gonadotrophin

(-trō′fĭn, -trō′pĭn)
n.
A hormone that stimulates the growth and activity of the gonads, especially any of several pituitary hormones that stimulate the function of the ovaries and testes.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

gonadotropin

Any of a family of protein hormones secreted by the pituitary, including follitropin (FSH), lutropin (LH) and (human) chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), which in concert regulate normal growth, sexual development and reproduction.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

gonadotropin

Gonadotrophin Endocrinology A hormone that regulates ♂ and ♀ reproduction Examples LH and FSH, produced by the anterior pituitary, stimulate the ovaries or testicles to secrete progesterone, testosterone, estrogen; chorionic gonadotropin is produced by the placenta and drives secretion of progesterone and estrogen, which are critical for maintaining the placenta during gestation. See FSH, hCG, LH.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

go·nad·o·tro·pin

(gō-nad'ō-trō'pin)
1. A hormone capable of promoting gonadal growth and function; such effects, as exerted by a single hormone, usually are limited to discrete functions or histologic components of a gonad, such as stimulation of follicular growth or of androgen formation; most gonadotropins exert their effects in both sexes, although the effect of a given gonadotropin will differ in males and females.
Synonym(s): gonadotrophin.
2. Any hormone that stimulates gonadal function.
3. Any substance that has the combined effects of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

go·nad·o·tro·pin

, gonadotropic hormone (gō-nad'ō-trō'pin, -pik hōr'mōn)
1. A hormone capable of promoting gonadal growth and function.
2. Any hormone that stimulates gonadal function.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The tests for differential diagnosis Patient Normal range Thyroxine Ab (%) <1 <10 Triiodothyronine Ab 5 <15 (%) Alpha subunit of 0.56 0.05-0.90 (before menopause) pituitary 0.05-1.60 (after menopause) glycoprotein hormones (ImU/ml) Table 3.
Luteinizing hormone A pituitary glycoprotein hormone that stimulates development of ovarian follicles to the preovulatory stage, induces ovulation, and causes the primary oocyte to complete the first meiotic division.
In addition to its synthesis during normal pregnancy, trophoblastic disease, or cancer, a small amount of hCG is normally produced by the pituitary gland in conjunction with the structurally similar glycoprotein hormones luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (3, 4).
Cross-reactivities were <0.002% with the other members of the glycoprotein hormone family, luteinizing hormone (measured up to 100 IU/L), follicle-stimulating hormone (measured up to 100 N/L), and TSH (measured up to 500 mN/L).
To date, however, neither mass spectrometric nor any other reference method is available for hCG or for any other glycoprotein hormone. In the absence of a definitive method, the best method available can be defined as the reference method.
hCG, in common with other glycoprotein hormones, is characterized by sugar moieties on both subunits that determine receptor affinity and metabolic clearance.
This implies that a slow and specific mechanism exists for the removal, deactivation, and degradation of the glycoprotein hormones. Such an unusual mechanism of metabolic clearance is worthy of further investigation, not only because might it be relevant to understanding the clearance processes of other proteins but because it might have clinical relevance to such diverse areas as altered renal function during disease.
Because the same degradation process is likely to act on both hCG[beta] and LH[beta] (and most probably FSH[beta] and TSH[beta]) the resulting core-defining epitopes would be common to all glycoprotein hormone urinary [beta]-core molecules (19, 27).
The [alpha] subunits of the 4 glycoprotein hormones, hCG, hLH, follicle-stimulating hormone, and thyroid-stimulating hormone are virtually identical, whereas the [beta] subunits differ.
Boime is a world-renowned scientist who has devoted his lengthy career focused on structure-function issues of the pituitary and placental glycoprotein hormones. Dr.
The legislation, if enacted, would cover three hard drug categories: anabolic androgenic steroids, Beta 2 agonists (other than asthma medications) and peptides and glycoprotein hormones and analogues, which include growth hormones and erythropoeitin.
Baenziger has focused on glycoprotein hormones produced by the pituitary and other glands.