glycolysis


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Related to glycolysis: pyruvate, Electron transport chain

glycolysis

 [gli-kol´ĭ-sis]
the anaerobic enzymatic conversion of glucose to lactate or pyruvate, resulting in energy stored in the form of ATP, as occurs in muscle. adj., adj glycolyt´ic.

gly·col·y·sis

(glī-kol'i-sis),
The energy-yielding conversion of d-glucose to lactic acid (instead of pyruvate oxidation products) in various tissues, notably muscle, when sufficient oxygen is not available (as in an emergency situation); because molecular oxygen is not consumed in the process, this is frequently referred to as "anaerobic glycolysis" Compare: Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway.
Synonym(s): glucolysis
[glyco- + G. lysis, a loosening]

glycolysis

(glī-kŏl′ə-sĭs)
n.
A metabolic process that occurs in nearly all living cells in which glucose is converted in a series of steps to pyruvic acid and during which energy is released in the form of ATP.

gly′co·lyt′ic adj.

gly·col·y·sis

(glī-kol'i-sis)
The energy-yielding conversion of d-glucose to lactic acid (instead of pyruvate oxidation products) in various tissues, notably muscle, when sufficient oxygen is not available; given that molecular oxygen is not consumed in the process, this is frequently referred to as "anaerobic glycolysis."
[glyco- + G. lysis, a loosening]

glycolysis

The breakdown of glucose or other sugars under the influence of enzymes, with the formation of lactic acid or pyruvic acid and the release of energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The complex biochemical sequence by which glucose-6-phosphate is converted to pyruvate and ATP.
Glycolysisclick for a larger image
Fig. 177 Glycolysis . The individual steps of glycolysis.

glycolysis

‘sugar-splitting’, the first stage of CELLULAR RESPIRATION, occurring with or without the presence of oxygen, in which glucose is converted to two molecules of pyruvic acid. See Fig. 177 . See also AEROBIC RESPIRATION.

Glycolysis

The pathway in which a cell breaks down glucose into energy.

gly·col·y·sis

(glī-kol'i-sis)
The energy-yielding conversion of glucose to lactic acid in various tissues, notably muscle, when sufficient oxygen is not available.
[glyco- + G. lysis, a loosening]
References in periodicals archive ?
The combination of 2DG and metformin leads to a drastic decrease of intracellular ATP via the inhibition of the mitochondrial complex 1 and glycolysis. Sahra et al.
With the higher potential conversion presented for the uncatalyzed reaction, the niobium salts were not used as a catalyst for this glycolysis process.
Mitochondria regulate the transcription factor Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 (HIF-1), which induces glycolysis under hypoxic conditions allowing cancer to thrive.
About a quarter of the women had a high amount of visceral fat and tumors whose glycolysis genes were significantly active.
They promote the efflux of lactic acid, constituting important players in the maintenance of tumor intracellular pH, as well as in the maintenance of the high rates of glycolysis [15-18].
GLUT-1 is expressed in tissues with high glucose demand that principally undergo glycolysis. This includes normal cells that display the Warburg effect, such as hematopoietic stem cells [13, 14].
Vander Heiden, "Aerobic glycolysis: meeting the metabolic requirements of cell proliferation," Annual Review of Cell and Developmental Biology, vol.
Thus, LPS induces an Hif1a-dependent heightening of glycolysis in macrophages.
Trained immunity from epigenetic reprogramming of macrophages shows high glucose consumption and a high ratio of [NAD.sup.+] to its reduced form NADH, reflecting a shift in metabolism with an increase in glycolysis and M1-like activation of macrophages, dependent on the activation of mTOR through the Akt-HIF-1[alpha] pathway [29].
The results suggest that Ldh-c expresses in skeletal muscles of plateau pika, and the pika skeletal muscle may get at least 32.42% ATP for its activities by LDH-C4 catalyzed anaerobic glycolysis, which reduces the dependence on oxygen and enhances the adaptation to the hypoxic environments.
In contrast to normal differentiated cells, which rely primarily on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to generate the energy needed for cellular processes, most cancer cells instead rely on aerobic glycolysis. This theory was described by Otto Warburg in 1924.
As per literature, aggressive tumor cells tend to divide quickly which outgrow their blood supply creating relative hypoxia within the tumor bed leading to anaerobic glycolysis with activation of enzyme lactate dehydrogenase and production of lactate.