glycogenesis


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

glycogenesis

 [gli″ko-jen´ĕ-sis]
the conversion of glucose to glycogen for storage in the liver. adj., adj glycogenet´ic.

gly·co·gen·e·sis

(glī'kō-jen'ĕ-sis),
Formation of glycogen from d-glucose by means of glycogen synthase and dextrin dextranase; the first enzyme catalyzes formation of a polyglucose with α-1,4 links from UDPglucose, and the second removes fragments from one chain and transfers them to an α-1,6 branch point in another.
[glyco- + G. genesis, production]

glycogenesis

(glī′kə-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs)
n.
The formation or synthesis of glycogen.

gly′co·ge·net′ic (-jə-nĕt′ĭk) adj.

gly·co·gen·e·sis

(glī'kō-jen'ĕ-sis)
Formation of glycogen from d-glucose by means of glycogen synthase and dextrin dextranase; the first enzyme catalyzes formation of a polyglucose with α-1,4 links from UDP glucose, the second cleaves fragments from one chain andtransfers them to an α-1,6 linkage in another.
[glyco- + G. genesis, production]

glycogenesis

The formation of the polymer GLYCOGEN from many GLUCOSE molecules.

glycogenesis

see GLYCOGEN.

gly·co·gen·e·sis

(glī'kō-jen'ĕ-sis)
Formation of glycogen from d-glucose by means of glycogen synthase and dextrin dextranase.
[glyco- + G. genesis, production]
References in periodicals archive ?
When the net flow [F.sub.R2]-[F.sub.2R] is positive, glycogenesis (and other metabolism) predominates, and when negative, glycogenolysis predominates.
Antihyperglycemic and glycogenesis effects of different fractions of Brassica oleracea in alloxan induced diabetic rats.International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Research, 2: 1436-1442.
The investigation addressed the regulation of hormonal control and the enzymatic (allosteric) controls of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, glycogenesis, glycogenolysis, lipogenesis, and lipolysis.
Some of the liver's many roles include: phagocytosis via Kupffer cells (macrophages); detoxifying drugs and poisons and metabolizing alcohol; producing bile and excreting it; breaking down bilirubin so it can be excreted; synthesizing and storing proteins (albumin and fibrinogen); synthesizing clotting factors; changing ammonia to urea; assisting in the metabolism of fats, carbohydrates, and proteins; and glycogenesis (converting glucose to glycogen) and glycogenolysis (breaking down glycogen to glucose).
(14) Interruption of work: Glycogenesis (sugar-metabolism) in the liver was discovered by Bernard, who measured in duplo, with many hours in between, because he was 'presse par le temps', two very different concentrations of suga in the liver.
The liver, a central organ of intermediary energy metabolism, plays a major role in processes such as gluconeogenesis, glycogenesis, glycogenolysis, and lipid metabolism.
Altogether, these actions of insulin promote glucose utilization from the blood and energy storage through increased glycogenesis, synthesis of fatty acids, and fat deposition.
Kim and colleagues [133] demonstrated that different anabolic processes, such as lipogenesis, glycogenesis, and protein synthesis increase during senescence in primary cell cultures.
It needs further study whether glucose and insulin promote glycogenesis in human.
T2DM animals present several conditions that favor glycogenesis such as (1) elevated levels of insulin, which stimulate glycogen synthesis through inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) that is known to maintain GYS1 in an activated form; (2) hyperglycaemia, which increases the blood-to-testicles glucose availability, exerting an allosteric activation on GYS1 via glucose-6-phosphate (accelerating glycogen synthesis) [55, 56]; (3) increased testicular levels of UDP-glucose, an active intermediate in the synthesis of glycogen [25].
In diabetic rats treated with N-Trisaccharide, the liver glycogen was brought back to near normal level and this could be due to increased secretion of insulin that enhances glycogenesis.
This increase may occur through the activation of glycogenesis and/or inhibition of processes such as glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis, all of which are regulated by insulin [27].