Armanni-Ebstein change

(redirected from glycogen infiltration)

Ar·man·ni-Eb·stein kid·ney

(ahr-mah'nē eb'stīn),
glycogen vacuolization of the loops of Henle, seen in diabetics before the introduction of insulin.

Armanni-Ebstein change

A global term for a histopathological finding commonly seen in patients with diabetes mellitus, which was described by L Armanni (1839–1903) and W Ebstein (1836–1912) in the pre-insulin era. It is reversible, less common in the current environment and consists of marked cytoplasmic (glycogen-induced) vacuolisation; it is classically seen in proximal convoluted tubules of the kidney, but also in the beta islet cells and hepatocytes.

Ebstein,

Wilhelm, German physician, 1836-1912.
Armanni-Ebstein change - see under Armanni
Armanni-Ebstein kidney - Synonym(s): Armanni-Ebstein change
Armanni-Ebstein nephropathy - see under Armanni
Ebstein anomaly - congenital downward displacement of the tricuspid valve into the right ventricle. Synonym(s): Ebstein disease; Ebstein malformation
Ebstein disease - Synonym(s): Ebstein anomaly
Ebstein malformation - Synonym(s): Ebstein anomaly
Ebstein sign - in pericardial effusion, obtuseness of the cardiohepatic angle on percussion.
Murchison-Pel-Ebstein syndrome - see under Murchison
Pel-Ebstein disease - Synonym(s): Pel-Ebstein fever
Pel-Ebstein fever - see under Pel

Armanni,

Luciano, Italian pathologist, 1839-1903.
Armanni-Ebstein change - glycogen vacuolization of the loops of Henle, seen in diabetics before the introduction of insulin. Synonym(s): Armanni-Ebstein kidney
Armanni-Ebstein kidney - Synonym(s): Armanni-Ebstein change
Armanni-Ebstein nephropathy - diabetic glycogen vacuolization of renal convoluted tubules; related to glycosuria.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cardiac rhabdomyoma is characterized by large glycogen containing vacuolated cells and is also referred to as rhabdomyomatosis, congenital glycogen tumor, circumscribed glycogen storage disease, nodular glycogen degeneration, nodular glycogen, and nodular glycogen infiltration (KIZAWA et al., 2002).