glycerol


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Related to glycerol: propylene glycol

glyc·er·ol

(glis'ĕr-ol),
A sweet viscous fluid obtained by the saponification of fats and fixed oils; used as a solvent, as a skin emollient, by injection or in the form of suppository for constipation, and as a vehicle and sweetening agent.
Synonym(s): 1, 2, 3-propanetriol, glycerin, glycerite (1) , glyceryl alcohol

glycerol

/glyc·er·ol/ (-ol) a trihydroxy sugar alcohol that is the backbone of many lipids and an important intermediate in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Pharmaceutical preparations are called glycerin.

glycerol

(glĭs′ə-rôl′, -rōl′)
n.
A syrupy, sweet, colorless or yellowish liquid triol, C3H8O3, obtained from fats and oils as a byproduct of saponification and used as a solvent, antifreeze, plasticizer, and sweetener and in the manufacture of dynamite, cosmetics, liquid soaps, inks, and lubricants.

glycerol (C3H8O3)

[glis′ərôl]
Etymology: Gk, glykys, sweet
an alcohol that is a component of fats. Glycerol is soluble in ethyl alcohol and water. Also called 1, 2, 3-propanetriol. See also glycerin.

glyc·er·ol

(glis'ĕr-ol)
A sweet oily fluid obtained by the saponification of fats and fixed oils; used as a solvent, as a skin emollient, by injection or in suppository form for constipation, orally to reduce ocular tension, and as a vehicle and sweetening agent.
Glycerolclick for a larger image
Fig. 174 Glycerol . Molecular structure.

glycerol

or

glycerin

a simple LIPID that is a basic component of fats. See Fig. 174 . Glycerol contains high amounts of energy which can be released in metabolism. see GLYCOLYSIS.

glycerol

three-carbon carbohydrate; known as the 'backbone of triacylglycerol'. Blood glycerol concentration mainly depends on the rate of lipolysis of triglycerides in adipose tissue. Glycerol is an important source of glucose during periods of fasting or starvation. In sport, consumption of glycerol may be used for hyperhydration, as it reduces renal water clearance, increasing fluid retention and total body water. See also gluconeogenesis, hydration status.

glycerol

; glycerin pig fat-derived fluid, used as a solvent or an emollient

glyc·er·ol

, glycerin (glis'ĕr-ol, -in)
A sweet viscous fluid obtained by the saponification of fats and fixed oils; used as a solvent, as a skin emollient, by injection or in the form of suppository for constipation, and as a sweetener.

glycerol,

n.pr an alcohol that is a component of fats. See also glycerin.

glycerol

a trihydric sugar alcohol, CH2OH⋅CHOH⋅CH2OH, which is a component of triglycerides. Pharmaceutical preparations are called glycerin.

glycerol guaiacolate
see glyceryl guaiacolate.
glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase
two enzymes, an NAD+-dependent form in the cytosol and an FAD-dependent form present in the inner mitochondrial membrane. These two enzymes complete the transfer of reducing power generated as NADH+H+ during glycolysis through to FADH2 which can enter complex II of the oxidative phosphorylation sequence. This process is called the glycerophosphate shuttle.
glycerol phosphate shuttle
main means for the transfer of reducing power generated in the cytosol as NADH+H+ to the mitochondrion as FADH2 so that ATP can be generated in oxidative phosphorylation. There is the loss of one potential ATP as a consequence of this shuttle. Commonly found in the brain.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the glycerol oxidation experiments glycerol ([greater than or equal to]98%, Fluka), NaOH (reagent grade, Sigma--Aldrich) and oxygen (98%, AGA) were used.
As shown in [Figure 3], glycerol injection significantly increased TNF-a, IL-6, and IL-1[sz] levels in plasma, which was suppressed by CLI-095 or PDTC treatment ( P < 0.
Although the acetate concentrations from animals fed crude glycerine associated with starch- or fiber-based ingredients in low concentrate were not lower than acetate concentrations from animals fed high concentrate diets, these concentrations were similar between these diets, reporting the glycogenic property of glycerol in low concentrate diets.
aerogenes TISTR 1468 and glycerol derived as a by-product of the jatropha biodiesel production.
Co-author of the study Professor Stuart Taylor, deputy director of the Cardiff Catalysis Institute, said: "We set out to establish ways in which the waste product glycerol could be used to form other useful compounds, but we were surprised when we found that feeding glycerol and water over such a simple catalyst gave such valuable products and interesting chemistry.
3), and 10 groups were vacuum treated with 20 percent glycerol (20 min of vacuum at 800 Pa).
Reasonably, it is much more efficient for the parasite to use readily available blood glycerol as a precursor to biosynthesis of the glycerolipids than to generate glycerol from glucose, its sole energy source (Beitz, 2007).
The glycerol content of the extrudates was calculated based on the protein contents of the extrudate, compared with the starting protein isolate.
First part was tak en as control part while in second, third and fourth part food grade glycerol (Sigma Chemical, Inc.
Among the bio-based raw materials for coatings, triglyceride oils are traditionally used in oxidative curing do-it-yourself and architectural coatings but also as a raw material for alkyd resins and glycerol, not least because of their global availability and comparable low costs.
It is an innovative way for adding value to the glycerol produced in biodiesel plants.