gluten-free


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Related to gluten-free: celiac disease

gluten-free

Containing little or no barley, oat, rye, or wheat proteins. The phrase is used to certify that particular foods or nutritional products are safe to eat for people with celiac disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Products containing these grains should be avoided on a gluten-free diet (Mayo Clinic, 2011).
In this report, the North American gluten-free food market has been broadly discussed on the basis of its types.
Some coeliacs can tolerate uncontaminated gluten-free oats.
The gluten-free claim can be placed anywhere on a label, as long as it complies with the new federal regulation guidelines and contains the mandatory labeling information.
The gluten-free diet has traditionally depended on starch from rice, corn, and potatoes.
Thanks to Glanbia's full ownership of the NSF certified OatSecure[TM] closed loop supply chain process, the plant is unique in processing only oat ingredients to guarantee a certified gluten-free product.
Then there's Glutino, which sells gluten-free Toaster Pastries (think Pop-Tarts), Chocolate Vanilla Creme Cookies, Baked Potato Crisps, and Pretzels (including some coated with "yogurt" or "chocolate," which means they're essentially coated with sugar and palm kernel oil).
Even Pizza Express has introduced a gluten-free base so customers can still enjoy eating pizza - and wash it down with a gluten-free beer.
Going gluten-free for some people may be more of a trend than a treatment," says Bridget S, Benelam, senior nutrition scientist at the British Nutrition Foundation.
Here, we weigh up the pros and cons of choosing to go gluten free: Here, we weigh up the pros and cons of choosing to go gluten free: DOWNSIDES OF GOING GLUTEN-FREE WHEN YOU DON'T NEED TO.
Now, as the gluten-free market continues to grow and as millions of Americans follow diets free from other common allergens - including the "Big Eight" - those terms are common and so, too, are free-from products across store shelves.
Although not yet proven and further research is needed, some people claim that going on a gluten-free and casein-free diet (GFCF Diet) have relieved symptoms of autism, a condition affecting brain function, social and communication skills.