gluconeogenesis


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Related to gluconeogenesis: Cori cycle

gluconeogenesis

 [gloo″ko-ne″o-jen´ĕ-sis]
the synthesis of glucose from noncarbohydrate sources, such as amino acids and glycerol. It occurs primarily in the liver and kidneys whenever the supply of carbohydrates is insufficient to meet the body's energy needs. Gluconeogenesis is stimulated by cortisol and other glucocorticoids and by the thyroid hormone thyroxine. Formerly called glyconeogenesis.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

glu·co·ne·o·gen·e·sis

(glū'kō-nē'ō-jen'ĕ-sis),
The formation of glucose from noncarbohydrates, such as protein or fat.
Synonym(s): glyconeogenesis (2)
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

gluconeogenesis

(glo͞o′kə-nē′ə-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs)
n.
The formation of glucose, especially by the liver, from noncarbohydrate sources, such as amino acids and the glycerol portion of fats.

glu′co·ne′o·ge·net′ic (-ō-jə-nĕt′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

gluconeogenesis

The formation of glucose from noncarbohydrate molecules–eg, amino acids, lactic acid
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

glu·co·ne·o·gen·e·sis

(glū'kō-nē'ō-jen'ĕ-sis)
The formation of glucose from noncarbohydrates, such as protein or fat.
Compare: glyconeogenesis
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

gluconeogenesis

The formation of glucose from non-carbohydrate sources, especially from AMINO ACIDS from protein. GLUCOCORTICOID hormones stimulate gluconeogenesis.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

gluconeogenesis

the process by which PYRUVIC ACID (pyruvate) is converted to GLUCOSE. This is not the exact reversal of GLYCOLYSIS. Three of the reactions of glycolysis are irreversible and it is in these three that gluconeogenesis differs. In the CELL gluconeogenesis is normally more active when there is little need for ATP. The process meets the needs of the body for glucose when CARBOHYDRATE is not available in adequate amounts from the diet. Non-carbohydrates, such as FAT and PROTEIN, can be converted into glucose, notably in the LIVER and KIDNEY.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

glu·co·ne·o·gen·e·sis

(glū'kō-nē'ō-jen'ĕ-sis)
The formation of glucose from noncarbohydrates, such as protein or fat.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
These results suggested that a low energy density diet was beneficial in controlling lipolysis and promoting the capacity for hepatic gluconeogenesis postpartum.
It is possible that all the mitochondrial steps of gluconeogenesis had been accelerated by training, hence draining lactate and pyruvate for glucose production.
Modulation of key enzymes of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, amino acid catabolism, and TCA cycle of the tropical freshwater fish Labeo rohita fed gelatinized and non-gelatinized starch diet.
Gluconeogenesis was assessed using a pyruvate tolerance test.
Gao et al., "Irisin inhibits hepatic gluconeogenesis and increases glycogen synthesis via the PI3K/Akt pathway in type 2 diabetic mice and hepatocytes," Clinical Science, vol.
In the setting of severe insulin deficiency, glucagon might devote primarily to ketogenesis rather than to gluconeogenesis [41].
Blood glucose increases in response to sugar/starch ingestion, overproduction of glucose (gluconeogenesis) in our liver, and other factors related to aging.
Zheng, "Mulberry anthocyanin extract regulates glucose metabolism by promotion of glycogen synthesis and reduction of gluconeogenesis in human HepG2 cells," Food & Function, vol.
Through this pathway, four-carbon succinate is produced from acetyl CoA that can enter gluconeogenesis and is therefore an alternate path for the synthesis of glucose from glycerol.
(1) issues in the metabolic pathway of propylene glycol including (i) missing enzymes for lactate and/or pyruvate breakdown, (ii) activation of the gluconeogenesis pathway, or (iii) toxicity secondary to lactic acidosis,
Its hypoglycemic action is due to reduced gluconeogenesis, increased insulin receptor sensitivity, especially in muscle cells, and decreased glucose uptake in the intestine [4, 20].
Alterations and related metabolic pathways were discussed, and it turned out that following metabolic pathways were involved in C[Cl.sub.4] induced liver damage and liver protective efficacy: betaine metabolism, synthesis of LDL/VLDL, gluconeogenesis and glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, creatine metabolism, synthesis of ketone bodies, amino acids metabolism, and [beta]-oxidation of fatty acids.