powder

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powder

 [pow´der]
an aggregation of particles, as that obtained by grinding or rubbing a solid.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pow·der

(pow'dĕr),
1. A dry mass of minute separate particles of any substance.
2. In pharmaceutics, a homogeneous dispersion of finely divided, relatively dry, particulate matter consisting of one or more substances; the degree of fineness of a pow'der is related to passage of the material through standard sieves.
3. A single dose of a powdered drug, enclosed in an envelope of folded paper.
4. To reduce a solid substance to a state of fine division.
[Fr. poudre; L. pulvis]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

powder

(pou′dər)
n.
1. A substance consisting of ground, pulverized, or otherwise finely dispersed solid particles.
2. Any of various preparations in the form of powder, as certain cosmetics and medicines.

pow′der·er n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

powder

Chinese medicine
A general term for ground herbs and formulas used in Chinese herbal medicine to prepare in capsules, infusions, liquors, porridges, ointments, pastes and pills; powders are less concentrated than decoctions, gentler, are best suited for chronic conditions.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

powder

Drug slang A pulverized abuse substance–eg, heroin, amphetamine, cocaine Vox populi A pulverized material. See Antler velvet powder, Dover's powder, Fluticasone propionate inhalation powder, Inheritance powder, James Fever powder, Talcum powder.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

pow·der

(pow'dĕr)
1. A dry mass of minute separate particles of any substance.
2. pharmaceutics A homogeneous dispersion of finely divided, relatively dry particulate matter consisting of one or more substances.
3. A single dose of a powdered drug, enclosed in an envelope of folded paper.
4. To reduce a solid substance to a state of very fine division.
[Fr. poudre; L. pulvis]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

pow·der

(pow'dĕr)
1. A dry mass of minute separate particles of any substance.
2. In pharmaceutics, a homogeneous dispersion of finely divided, relatively dry, particulate matter consisting of one or more substances.
[Fr. poudre; L. pulvis]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Aerosolized glove powder can transport bacteria and microbes from the contaminated gloves themselves or from other sources, potentially inducing a nosocomial infection or occupational illness.[1,6] Glove powder also can transport chemicals used in manufacturing the gloves themselves into the air, along with other chemicals found in health care facilities such as formaldehyde or gluteraldehyde.
Aerosolized glove powder carries aeroallergen concentrations of latex proteins, which easily cling to the glove powder particles.
Glove powder can act as a fomite, carrying infectious organisms such as VRE (vancomycin-resistant enterococcus) or MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus).
Cornstarch glove powder has been mistaken for some microorganisms because it stains Gram positive.
Other documented adverse reactions to cornstarch glove powder include: postoperative synovial inflammation, retroperitoneal fibrosis, meningismus post-craniotomy, post-thoracotomy syndrome, endophthalmitis, pseudotumors, pericardial fibrosis, intra-abdominal granulomas in postoperative heart surgery patients, corneal inflammation postophthalmic surgery, adhesions to the Fallopian tubes, pelvic pain, infertility and myocardial contamination following catheterization.[1, 4, 10, 13]
Unfortunately, this is now known to be highly ineffective, leaving large amounts of powder on the surface of the glove in the form of clumps, enhancing a delayed foreign body reaction.[1, 5] The most effective way to remove glove powder is to wash the outside of the glove with a 10 ml of povidone-iodine solution for 60 seconds, followed by a 30-second rinse with sterile water.
Glove powders may inadvertently contaminate patients during surgical procedures and have caused granulomata in some patients [6].
Critical issues: the impact of glove powder. First Hand 1994;1:1-4.
These gloves offer powder-free protection that eliminates the aerosolization of glove powder as well as powder transfer of latex proteins.
All gloves contain 50 micrograms per gram or less of water soluble protein and are powder-free to eliminate starch glove powder complications.
Affected workers are still at risk when exposed to a latex glove powdered environment, even in the wards, outpatient departments or corridors of hospitals.