glottis


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Related to glottis: epiglottis

glottis

 [glot´is] (pl. glot´tides) (Gr.)
the vocal apparatus of the larynx, consisting of the true vocal cords (vocal folds) and the opening between them. adj., adj glot´tal.

glot·tis

, pl.

glot·ti·des

(glot'is, glot'i-dēz), [TA]
The vocal apparatus of the larynx, consisting of the vocal folds of mucous membrane investing the vocal ligament and vocal muscle on each side, the free edges of which are the vocal cords, and of a median fissure, the rima glottidis.
[G. glōttis, aperture of the larynx]

glottis

(glŏt′ĭs)
n. pl. glot·tises or glottides (glŏt′ĭ-dēz′)
1. The opening between the vocal cords at the upper part of the larynx.
2. The vocal apparatus of the larynx.

glot·tis

, pl. glottides (glotis, glot-idi-dēz) [TA]
The vocal apparatus of the larynx, consisting of the vocal folds of mucous membrane investing the vocal ligament and vocal muscle on each side, the free edges of which are the vocal cords, and of a median fissure, the rima glottidis.
[G. glōttis, aperture of the larynx]

glottis

The narrow, slit-like opening between the vocal cords and between the false vocal cords and the space between them. The vocal apparatus of the larynx.

glottis

see EPIGLOTTIS.

Glottis

The opening between the vocal cords at the upper part of the larynx.
Mentioned in: Cough

glot·tis

, pl. glottides (glotis, -idi-dēz) [TA]
Vocal laryngeal apparatus, consisting of vocal folds of mucous membrane investing vocal ligament and vocal muscle on each side, free edges of which are the vocal cords, and of rima glottidis.
[G. glōttis, aperture of the larynx]
References in periodicals archive ?
I placed against the uvula the little mirror (which I had heated in warm water and carefully dried): then, flashing upon its surface with the hand mirror a ray of sunlight, I saw at once, to my great joy, the glottis wide open before me, and so fully exposed, that I could perceive a portion of the trachea.
Occasionally, even though the glottis is visualized, OTT orientation is difficult, because it tends to slide posteriorly, an issue found commonly in pediatric patients with micrognathia, short neck, and limited cervical extension, creating the need for the use of introducers or intubation guides at the time of inserting the OTT; (7-9) external laryngeal manipulation can also be used to solve the issue and guide orotracheal intubation with the Airtraq.
Successful intubation was helped by the pliability of the endotracheal tube and the shape of the tip which eventually enabled it to pass through the glottis.
Caption: Figure 1: (a) Lateral airway film demonstrating a circular foreign body consistent with a rubber band spanning the glottis. (b) Anterior airway film demonstrating narrowing of the airway.
Furthermore, the McGrath [R] video laryngoscope used was McGrath MAC 3, a McGrath Series 5, or Airtraq which may have provided better glottis exposure owing to the angle of its laryngoscope blade.
(1) The glottis, region of interest (Figure 3(b)), was firstly manually selected around the glottis from the first image frame (Figure 3(a)) of the video.
Case Onset of Sites of Events leading number laryngeal laryngeal to discovery of symptoms involvement laryngeal involvement 1 Hoarse voice Glottis and Laryngoscopy subglottic due to hoarse region voice 2 NA Subglottic Laryngoscopy region due to nasal obstruction 3 Hoarse voice Glottis and Laryngoscopy subglottic due to hoarse region voice 4 NA Glottis and Routine subglottic laryngoscopy region 5 Hoarse voice Glottis and Routine and suffocation subglottic laryngoscopy region Case Sites of number extranodal involvement 1 Skin 2 Nasal cavity 3 Nasal cavity, pharynx, submandibular gland 4 Nasal cavity, pharynx 5 NA Table 3: The course of treatment and relevant efficacy for the 5 RDD cases with laryngeal involvement.
Uria and colleagues reported using downward pressure on an existing oral endotracheal tube to bring the glottis into view, and a nasally placed bougie was inserted through the vocal cords to allow passage of an endotracheal tube (5).
The classification includes four grades (Grade I--Full view of glottis, Grade II--Supraglottisis not seen, Grade III--Epiglottis is visible while glottis is not visible, and Grade IV--Neither glottis nor epiglottis are seen).
So-called "reversible" injuries, including submucosal edema/hematoma with intact overlying mucosa as well as minor mucosal lacerations not involving the glottis and without accompanying cartilage fractures, can be treated nonoperatively.