glossopharyngeal


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glossopharyngeal

 [glos″o-fah-rin´je-al]
pertaining to the tongue and pharynx.
glossopharyngeal nerve the ninth cranial nerve; it supplies the carotid sinus, mucous membrane, and muscles of the pharynx, soft palate, and posterior third of the tongue, and the taste buds in the posterior third of the tongue. By serving the carotid sinus, the glossopharyngeal nerve provides for reflex control of the heart. It is also responsible for the swallowing reflex, for stimulating secretions of the parotid glands, and for the sense of taste in the posterior third of the tongue. See also anatomic Table of Nerves in the Appendices.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

glos·so·pha·ryn·ge·al

(glos'ō-fă-rin'jē-ăl), Avoid the mispronunciation glossopharynge'al.
Relating to the tongue and pharynx.
See also: glossopharyngeal nerve [CN IX].
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

glos·so·pha·ryn·ge·al

(glos'ō-făr-in'jē-ăl)
Relating to the tongue and the pharynx.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
An autoradiographic examination of the central distribution of the trigeminal, facial, glossopharyngeal, and vagal nerves in the monkey.
Group III--Direct laryngoscopic intubation after glossopharyngeal block (DL-GN)
Glossopharyngeal neuralgias are classified as either classical or symptomatic; these two types differ mostly by the intercritical pain and sensory deficit in the nerve's territories of distribution seen in the latter type.
The stylopharyngeus muscle traverses the medial aspect of the styloid process to the lateral wall of the pharynx; it is innervated by the glossopharyngeal nerve.
They ascend lateral to the common carotid artery and they pass posterior to the internal carotid artery, superior to the XIIth cranial nerve and inferior to the glossopharyngeal nerve.
(1) It is innervated by Herrings nerve, a branch of glossopharyngeal nerve.
The cutaneous orifice of the third branchial fistula also opens anterior to the sternocleidomastoid muscle, but it courses only superiorly, passing posterior to the common or internal carotid artery, superior to the hypoglossal nerve, and inferior to the glossopharyngeal nerve.
These benign and slowly growing tumors can arise from the vagus, glossopharyngeal, and spinal accessory nerves; lesions at these different sites are not always distinguishable from each other, either clinically or on imaging.
Case series have shown that most medial neck tumors originate in the glossopharyngeal, vagus, accessory, hypoglossal, and sympathetic chain nerves, while lateral neck tumors originate in the cervical or brachial plexus nerves.
Other atypical presentations of this disease include entrapment of glossopharyngeal nerve (6) and even hypoglossal nerve palsy with Horner's syndrome.