glomerular disease

glomerular disease

Any of a large group of diseases that affect the glomerulus of the kidneys. They may be classified by clinical severity, by histological changes in the kidney, or by etiology. Etiological factors include primary glomerular disease; disease secondary to systemic disease, such as lupus erythematosus or polyarteritis; infectious disease such as streptococcal infection, malaria, syphilis, or schistosomiasis; metabolic disease such as diabetes or amyloidosis; toxins such as mercury, gold, or snake venom; serum sickness; and drug hypersensitivity.

Glomerular disease may also be associated with hereditary disorders (e.g., Alport's syndrome, Fabry's disease). See: glomerulonephritis; kidney; nephritis; nephrotic syndrome

The clinical consequences of glomerular diseases are associated both with the causes and with the extent of glomerular damage and typically include edema, proteinuria and hypertension.

References in periodicals archive ?
Renal biopsy and pathologic evaluation of glomerular disease. Topics in companion animal medicine, v.26, p.143-153, 2011.
The team also found that children with the glomerular disease had a faster disease progression than those with a nonglomerular disease--a 43 percent shorter interval.
Compared to children with non-glomerular disease, children with glomerular disease had an estimated 43 percent shorter time to event.
Microscopic evaluation of the urinary sediment revealed dysmorphic red blood cells suggesting glomerular disease (2 red blood cell casts and 60-80 red blood cells per high-power field with >10% of G1 cells and >80% dysmorphic erythrocytes).
Glomerulonephritis can be classified into primary glomerular disease (primary GN) when there is no associated disease and secondary glomerular disease (secondary GN) when glomeruli involvement is part of a systemic disease such as connective tissue diseases, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic vasculitis, and infective endocarditis.
IgA nephropathy (IgAN, Berger's disease) is one of the most predominant variants of primary glomerular disease, ultimately leading to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in a great proportion of patients (approximately 30-40%) [1].
Biopsy-proven cases of glomerular disease in anti-VEGF therapy are few; however, most have demonstrated changes in keeping with glomerular thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) histology, with predominant endotheliosis and membranoproliferative changes [30, 31].
Chemically induced glomerular disease, although much less common than the immune mediated forms of glomerulonephritis, occurs in variety of different ways (LoPachin, 2004; Takenaka et al., 2004).
Conclusion: Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis was leading cause of primary glomerular diseases. While secondary glomerular disease (SGN) in our population was most commonly caused by lupus nephritis (LN).
Results: Most patients with proteinuria (91%, n=182) have glomerular disease. Among glomerular diseases, primary ones are more common (69.8%) than secondary disorders (26.9%).
Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized with immune complex formation and renal involvement of lupus and may include several kinds of pathological conditions, but mostly, it is associated with immune complex-induced glomerular disease. Pauci-immune lupus nephritis is a very rare condition.