glochidium


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glochidium

a lamellibranch larva possessing a small bivalve shell and a tentacle-like sucker for attachment to a fish.
References in periodicals archive ?
After a glochidium attaches to a fish, epithelial cells and connective tissue migrate to encapsulate the larval mussel, forming a cyst that protects it from the aquatic environment.
However, the veliger, which is called a glochidium in the family Unionidae, has become a highly modified parasitic larva.
The parasite prevalence and mean intensity (MI), respectively, for the whole material were: Gyrodactylus sp., 5.8%, MI (+- SD) 2.6 +- 0.57; Diplostomum sp., 71.1%, MI 6.2 +- 4.64; Tylodelphys clavata, 98.1%, MI 175.7 +- 62.64; Tetracotyle sp., 3.9%, MI 1.5 +- 0.70; Clinostomum complanatum, 15.4%, MI 3.5 +- 4.40; Proteocephalus percae, 55.7%, MI 47.10 +- 55.67; Eustrongylides excisus, 94.2%, MI 42.2 +- 62.89; Glochidium sp., 30.8%, MI 23.5 +- 27.42.
Most unionoid bivalves attach to a host fish in order to metamorphose from a glochidium into a juvenile (Williams et al., 2008).
Development culminates with the glochidium, a bivalved larval form with a single adductor muscle, sensory cells, larval mantle tissue, and the primordia for gills and other juvenile organs (Arey, 1921; Kat, 1984; Jeong et al., 1993; Pekkarinen, 1996; Fisher and Dimock, 2002).
The average size ([+ or -] 95% CI) of a glochidium was 0.226 ([+ or -] 0.008) mm long and 0.254 ([+ or -] 0.009) mm high.
The transition from glochidium to juvenile is a critical step in the life history of freshwater bivalves of the family Unionidae.
Thus, a host is required for laboratory glochidial metamorphosis from parasitic glochidium to juvenile mussel.